July 24, 1955 — August 3, 2019

Diane Louise Kopperman (née Billings) was born in Portland on July 24, 1955. Her parents soon divorced and she and her two siblings were put up for adoption. When Diane was ten she and her sister, Susan were adopted by James and Mary Fissel, residents of Salem.

After graduating from South Salem High School, Diane moved to Corvallis to attend Oregon State University. In 1982, she became an assistant secretary in the Department of History, and it was there that she met Paul Kopperman, a member of faculty. They married on June 15, 1983, and would have two children, Melissa in 1984 and Aaron in 1989.

A lifelong student, mainly at OSU and Portland State University, Diane would go on to obtain two Master's Degrees. In 1995, hoping to find employment that reflected her education and interests, she moved to the Portland area, though the family remained close by commuting.

Diane greatly enjoyed arts and crafts, and over her life engaged in stained glass, quilting, sketching and book-making, among other specialties. In her later years, she often did art projects with her granddaughters, Celina and Zara. Attracted to a range of cultures, she traveled widely, so long as her health permitted. She also engaged in much volunteer work, in such organizations as the Special Olympics, ARC, and Stone Soup, and taught English as a second language. During her time in Corvallis, she was quite involved with Beit Am.

Unfortunately, Diane suffered from poor health for much of her life. She was diagnosed with Type I Diabetes in 1989, and also suffered from asthma, fibromyalgia and heart disease. On top of this, she endured many physical injuries, which led to chronic pain and declining mobility.

Diane passed away suddenly at her home in Cornelius on August 3, and was laid to rest August 19 at Sunset Hills Memorial Park in Portland.

She is survived by her husband; her son; and daughter; and two granddaughters. For them, her memory is a blessing. Donations to honor her may be made to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

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