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    Cleaning fees are one-time charges that Airbnb hosts can tack on to the nightly rate. They’ve become a pain point for many travelers because cleaning fees can be exorbitantly high in some cases and are not shown in search results. Airbnb aims to make them more transparent by adding a search filter for total booking cost and requiring hosts to put cleaning requirements — like stripping the beds or taking out trash — on the listing. These new features may help customers make more informed decisions when booking and incentivize hosts to lower or forgo cleaning fees altogether.

      There has been a surge in the number of Mexicans seeking asylum in Canada this year. The reasons for the big jump include the relative ease for Mexicans to obtain refugee status in Canada compared to the U.S., visa-free travel between Mexico and Canada, and the threat of violence back home. More than 8,000 Mexican nationals have applied for asylum in Canada since the start of the year. That is six times as many as last year and more than twice as many as in 2019, which was the last year before the COVID-19 pandemic and the travel restrictions that accompanied it. The majority of the asylum seekers are flying into Montreal. The city has many direct flights between the two countries.

        North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s daughter made a public appearance again, this time with missile scientists and more honorific titles as her father’s “most beloved” or “precious” child. She’s only about 10, but her new, bold photos released Sunday by state media are deepening the debate over whether she’s being primed as a successor. She took group photos with scientists and others involved in what the reports called the test-launch of its Hwasong-17 intercontinental ballistic missile earlier this month. South Korea's spy service said last week that she is Kim’s second child, Ju Ae, who is approximately 10 years old.

          Protests against China’s anti-virus controls that have confined millions of people to their homes spread to Shanghai and other cities after complaints the death toll in a fire in China’s northwest might have been worsened by the restrictions. A witness in Shanghai said police used pepper spray against about 300 protesters. They were gathered to mourn the deaths of at least 10 people in an apartment fire last week in Urumqi in the northwest. Videos on social media showed protesters in other cities including Nanjing in the east and Guangzhou in the south tussling with police. President Xi Jinping's government faces mounting anger at restrictions at a time when other countries are relaxing controls.

          Nebraska agriculture officials say another 1.8 million chickens must be killed after bird flu was found on a farm. It's the latest sign that the outbreak has kept spreading after having already prompted the slaughter of more than 50 million birds nationwide. The Nebraska Department of Agriculture said Saturday that the state's 13th case of bird flu was found on an egg-laying farm in northeast Nebraska's Dixon County. All the chickens on the Nebraska farm are being killed to limit the spread of the disease. Officials say the virus presents little risk to human health because human cases are extremely rare and infected birds aren't allowed into the nation's food supply.

          Protesters angered by strict anti-virus measures have called for China’s powerful leader to resign. That's an unprecedented rebuke. It came as authorities in at least eight cities struggled to suppress demonstrations Sunday that represent a rare direct challenge to the ruling Communist Party. Police using pepper spray drove away demonstrators in Shanghai who called for Xi Jinping to step down and an end to one-party rule. Hours later, people rallied again in the same spot. Police again broke up the demonstration, and a reporter saw protesters under arrest being driven away in a bus. The protests began Friday and have spread to cities including the capital, Beijing, and dozens of university campuses. They are the most widespread show of opposition to the ruling party in decades.

          Connecticut lawmakers are set to discuss gasoline taxes, heating-bill help, pandemic pay for essential workers and other issues when they convene for a special legislative session on Monday. Gov. Ned Lamont has said he's calling the General Assembly into special session to help Connecticut residents cope with rising prices. Connecticut’s 25-cent-per-gallon gasoline tax is currently suspended through Nov. 30. The Democratic governor wants to keep the tax on hold until the end of the year, then start adding back five cents per month until hitting the prior 25-cent-per-gallon amount in May.

          Matt Hancock, the U.K’s scandal-prone former health secretary, is seeking an unlikely form of redemption: attempting to win “I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here” — a grueling, often gruesome reality TV show set in the Australian jungle. Hancock led Britain’s response to COVID-19 in the first year of the pandemic, telling people to stay away from others to protect the health service, then breaking his Government’s own rules, when video emerged of him kissing and groping an aide he was having an affair with. Viewers have upended expectations by voting Hancock through to the show's final.

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