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This week's bestsellers from Publishers Weekly
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This week's bestsellers from Publishers Weekly

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Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, June 5, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2021 NPD Group.

(Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2021, PWxyz LLC.)

HARDCOVER FICTION

1. "Golden Girl" by Elin Hilderbrand (Little, Brown) Last week: —

2. "Malibu Rising: A Novel" by Taylor Jenkins Reid (Ballantine) Last week: —

3. "The Last Thing He Told Me: A Novel" by Laura Dave (Simon & Schuster) Last week: 3

4. "Sooley: A Novel" by John Grisham (Doubleday) Last week: 2

5. "Legacy: A Novel" by Nora Roberts (St. Martin's) Last week: 1

6. "The Midnight Library" by Matt Haig (Viking) Last week: 6

7. "Project Hail Mary" by Andy Weir (Ballantine) Last week: 4

8. "The Other Black Girl: A Novel" by Zakiya Dalila Harris (Atria) Last week: —

9. "The Four Winds: A Novel" by Kristin Hannah (St. Martin’s) Last week: 11

10. "21st Birthday (Women's Murder Club, 21)" by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro (Little, Brown) Last week: 8

HARDCOVER NONFICTION

1. "Killing the Mob: The Fight Against Organized Crime in America" by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard (St. Martin's) Last week: 3

2. "How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America" by Clint Smith (Little, Brown) Last week: —

3. "What Happened to You? Conversations on Trauma, Resilience, and Healing" by Bruce D. Perry and Oprah Winfrey (Flatiron/Oprah) Last week: 4

4. "After the Fall: Being American in the World We've Made" by Ben Rhodes (Random House) Last week: —

5. "Greenlights" by Matthew McConaughey (Crown) Last week: 6

6. "The Anthropocene Reviewed: Essays On A Human-Centered Planet (Signed Edition)" by John Green (Dutton) Last week: 3

7. "The Premonition: A Pandemic Story" by Michael Lewis (Norton) Last week: 10

8. "The Hill We Climb: An Inaugural Poem for the Country" by Amanda Gorman (Viking) Last week: 5

9. "The Bomber Mafia: A Dream, a Temptation, and the Longest Night of the Second World War" by Malcolm Gladwell (Little, Brown) Last week: 11

10. "Zero Fail: The Rise and Fall of the Secret Service" by Carol Leonnig (Random House) Last week: 9

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NONFICTION: Liv Arnesen recounts her 1994 solo journey to the South Pole. "Skiing Into the Bright Open" by Liv Arnesen, translated from the Norwegian by Roland Huntford; University of Minnesota Press (208 pages, $21.95) ——— There's something wonderfully perplexing about Norwegian adventurer Liv Arnesen's account of her solo ski journey to the South Pole. She did this in 1994, the first woman ...

"Rachel to the Rescue" by Elinor Lipman; Mariner Press (296 pages, $15.99) ——— Elinor Lipman's latest novel, "Rachel to the Rescue," might not stand the test of time, but for this particular time, it's hilarious. Rachel has just gotten fired from her job in the Trump White House for accidentally sending an email to the entire White House staff criticizing the president. (Oh, the perils of ...

FICTION: A migrant child washes up on a beach — alive — in Omar El Akkad's follow-up to "American War." "What Strange Paradise" by: Omar El Akkad; Alfred A. Knopf (256 pages, $25.95) ——— In his 2017 debut novel, "American War," Omar El Akkad spotlighted Middle East humanitarian crises by reimagining them on U.S. soil. Perhaps, the novel implied, Americans might pay refugees and sectarian ...

FICTION: A handsome teacher appears to be grooming a young student — and then they both disappear. "The Temple House Vanishing" by Rachel Donohue; Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill (304 pages, $16.95) ——— Teenage crushes and charismatic teachers have been a fraught subject for millennia. A Socratic dialogue (Plato's "Phaedrus"), "The Letters of Abelard and Heloise," songs by the Police, and, in ...

FICTION: A thrilling debut in which a pilot must crash his plane to save his family. "Falling" by T.J. Newman; Avid Reader Press (304 pages, $28) ——— Early into "Falling," and not long into a flight from Los Angeles to New York, the pilot-protagonist Bill Hoffman takes a calculated risk and confides in a hushed tone to his friend. "Jo," he whispers. "We have a situation." Which is something of ...

In Maggie Nelson’s “Bluets,” her 2009 collection of poems on grief and loss, loneliness is “solitude with a problem.” Which is a useful way of understanding loneliness. Being alone and feeling lonely are not always the same thing. Except, of course, it’s complicated. Emily Dickinson wondered: Was loneliness “the maker of the soul”? Or its “seal”? Does loneliness define you? Or exacerbate ...

It's been only a few months since I took on the monumental task of organizing my books, and once again, they are a mess. Last September, I went through every book in the house and decided on what to keep and what to give. The "to give" pile turned into dozens of piles, bags and boxes, filling our front porch. I hauled tables out into the front yard, invited friends and neighbors to stop by, ...

Sure, Prince William’s tweets made international news after the Euro 2020 soccer championships. But his brother, Harry, is on a mission to craft his own narrative, one far longer than 280 characters. Backed by Penguin Random House, the younger prince will publish an “intimate and heartfelt” memoir on the life, lessons and losses that have shaped him, tentatively planned for release in late ...

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