Oregon Recreation Report

2008-10-03T00:00:00Z Oregon Recreation Report Lebanon Express
October 03, 2008 12:00 am

The Oregon Recreation Report (fishing, hunting viewing), updated Tuesday, Sept. 30, by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Tag sale deadline is Friday, Oct. 3

Don't forget, the tag sale deadline for many big game animals (Western Oregon deer centerfire, black bear, cougar) is Oct. 3.

Learn to tie your own flies, Saturday, Oct. 11

This one-day class will show you how to ties wet, dry and streamer flies. All equipment, materials and lunch will be provided. The workshop will be held at the ODFW Headquarters in Salem. For more information, contact mark.newell@state.or.us or (503) 947-6018. Cost: $40.00.

Your hunting and fishing dollars at work:

Keeping Upland Game Birds Plentiful

Oregon offers some of the best upland game bird hunting in the West. The state's rich and diverse habitats support 12 different species of upland game birds and provide an almost unlimited number of hunting spots. To keep populations of upland game birds and their habitats healthy, ODFW biologists depend on revenue from upland game bird validations (stamps). Read more.

This weekend major fall hunting season begins

For deer and elk hunters, several check stations will be open where ODFW staff and volunteers will be available to take samples. Check stations are generally open from dawn until dusk; look for highway signs indicating stations are open.

Buck deer, Oct. 5-6

* I-84 West at Biggs Junction

* Prineville weigh station (just east of Prineville on Hwy 26)

* Highway 20 B&B Sporting Goods, Hines (Burns)

First bull elk season, Nov. 1-2

* Prineville weigh station (just east of Prineville on Hwy 26)

* I-84 West at Biggs Junction

Southwest region hunters can visit information booths located at several popular highway junctions during the two weekends of the black-tailed deer season (Oct. 4-5 and October 25-26) and opening weekend of the Cascade elk season (Oct. 18-19), and two weekends of the Coastal elk season (Nov.15-16,and 22-23) Regional staff, who are at the booths to talk with hunters, can also obtain a sample for CWD testing.

For these locations, booths open from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

* Molalla Tree Farm (by the Weyerhaeuser High Camp Mainline Gate on S. Dickey Prairie Road)- Deer (Oct 4-5 and 25-26) Elk ( Oct. 18-19)

* Baker Point Mainline Gate (off of Apiary Road, roughly 2 miles east of Hwy 47) - Deer (Oct.25-26), Elk (Nov.15-16)

* Yamhill Check station at the junction of NW Old Railroad Grade Road and NW Rockyford Road - Elk (Nov. 22-23)

Additionally, ODFW staff will be out in the field during the opening weekends of deer rifle and bull elk seasons to talk with hunters. Successful hunters that encounter ODFW staff can provide a sample then. Finally, beginning Monday Oct. 6, successful hunters can contact their nearest ODFW office and set up a time to stop by and provide a sample from the head of their animal.

WILLAMETTE VALLEY ZONE

FISHING

Weekend fishing opportunities

* Coho salmon fishing is "smoking hot" on the Sandy River, with many anglers taking advantage of the new 3-fish bag limit.

* Junction City Pond, Walter Wirth Pond, Walling Pond, St. Louis Ponds, and Salish Pond were recently stocked with jumbo trout (1 to 1.5 lbs.).

* As the mosquito season dies down, now is a good time to plan a high cascades lakes fishing trip. Check the web link http://www.dfw.state.or.us/swwd/fish_home.html#Angling and follow the links for "High Lake Stocking" and "High Lake Info" for help planning your trip.

* Catch-and-release angling for cutthroat trout remains open through Oct. 31 in many Willamette Valley streams.

EVENTS

Oct. 11 - Fly Tying. Learn to tie your own flies. Come and learn from some of the best fly tiers Oregon has to offer. Cost: $40. Location: ODFW headquarters, 3406 Cherry Avenue NE, Salem, OR 97303. Contact: mark.newell@state.or.us or 503-947-6018

Oct. 11-12 - 25th annual Salmon Festival at Oxbow Regional Park on the banks of the Sandy River. From I-84, take the Troutdale exit (17). Go past the truck stop to the light. Turn right on 257th, go 3 miles to Division. Turn left onto Division. Follow the signs 6.5 miles and turn left. Follow the road to the park.

Nov. 8 - The Wild & Scenic Environmental Film Festival, hosted by the Native Fish Society, Hollywood Theater, 4122 NE Sandy Blvd., Portland; Time - 7 p.m.; Admission - $10.

STOCKING SCHEDULE

Junction City Pond was recently stocked with 500 jumbo-sized (1-1.5 lbs each) trout.

Walter Wirth Pond was recently stocked with 350 jumbo-sized trout.

Walling Pond was recently stocked with 150 jumbo-sized trout.

Detroit Reservoir will be stocked with 5,000 legal-sized trout.

Dexter Reservoir will be stocked with 5,000 legal-sized trout.

Henry Hagg Lake will be stocked with 8,000 legal-sized trout.

Foster Reservoir will be stocked with 5,000 legal-sized trout.

Mt. Hood College Pond will be stocked with 400 legal-sized trout and 50 larger trout.

Timber Lake will be stocked with 1,000 legal-sized trout.

WARM WATER ANGLING:

Members of the Oregon Bass and Panfish Club conducted their annual Multnomah Channel Challenge on September 27. The object of the tournament is to land 10 warmwater species in a single day. Participants caught 8 of the 10 target species - largemouth and smallmouth bass, bullhead catfish, crappie, pumpkinseeds, bluegill, yellow perch and walleye. A total of 35 anglers participated in the tournament, fishing from 15 boats.

The Portland metropolitan area, as well as the entire Willamette zone, offers many warm water fishing opportunities. A variety of species, including bass, bluegill, crappie, catfish, and perch are available to the summertime angler. Some of the waters to try include Dorman Pond, Hartman Pond, Salish Ponds, and Vernonia Pond. Please refer to the ODFW Web site for additional warm water angling locations.

CLACKAMAS RIVER: coho, steelhead

Angling for summer steelhead continues to be hit and miss for those out trying. The best bet for steelhead is likely to be above Barton, with the area from Dog Creek up to Rivermill Dam providing some opportunity for steelhead bank anglers. Lower McIver Park could also be worth the effort. The spring chinook fishery is, for all intents and purposes, over, and the quality of chinook caught at this time of year would be poor.

The coho catch rates have been fair with reports of a few caught as far up as Bonnie Lure Park. Coho jack numbers are reported to be quite high, which could bode well for next year's run. The greatest opportunity for bank anglers will likely be down in the Gladstone area closer to the river mouth and the bowling alley. Boat anglers are seeing a few fish in most holes all the way up to McIver Park. This is expected to be an excellent coho season and the anticipated rain later in the week should bolster the catch.

The river level has held steady for the past several weeks but flows should be on the rise with the expected rainfall. The Monday readings for the Clackamas showed flows at 985 cfs (10.98') with a water temperature of 56°.

Bank anglers can find access to the river in the Gladstone/Cross Park area, at Carver near the mouth of Clear Creek, along Clackamas River Rd, at Barton Park, at Bonnie Lure Park, at McIver Park near Dog Creek, and from the McIver Park boat ramp on up to River Mill Dam.

DETROIT, GREEN PETER AND FOSTER RESERVOIRS: rainbow trout, chinook salmon

Foster and Detroit Reservoirs will each be stocked with 5,000 legal-sized trout. On Sept. 16, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers lowered the level of Foster Reservoir to perform maintenance on the dams spillway gates. The Sunnyside boat ramp is still be useable at this elevation.

EAGLE CREEK: steelhead, coho salmon

Effective Sept. 17, a new temporary rule increases the daily bag limit for coho salmon on the Eagle Creek to three adipose fin-clipped coho. The rule will be in effect until the close of the coho fishery at the end of November.

Fishing pressure on Eagle Creek has been low. Stream flows have dropped to seasonal lows, and fish bound for the Eagle Creek National Fish Hatchery are likely holding in the Clackamas and Willamette until water levels increase. The most popular spots to try include the Bonnie Lure area, the water above and below the lower fish ladder, Eagle Fern Park, and up near the hatchery. Much of the creek meanders through private property so pay attention to your location and secure permission before fishing on private land.

FREEWAY LAKES (south of Albany): Largemouth bass, crappie, bluegill

Prospects should be good.

EE WILSON Pond: Largemouth bass

This is the last week to fish at the angling pond at EE Wilson Wildlife Area. The pond will close to angling the end of September.

GOLD LAKE: brook trout, rainbow trout

Gold Lake opened to angling May 24. Fly angling only with barbless hooks. Catch and release for rainbow trout. There is no limit on size or number of brook trout taken.

JUNCTION CITY POND: rainbow trout

The pond was recently stocked with 500 jumbo-sized trout (1-1.5 lbs. each) this week.

MOLALLA RIVER: steelhead

Some chinook might be found in the upper river, between Canby and Molalla.

NORTH AND SOUTH SANTIAM: steelhead

Steelhead recycling in the North Santiam at the Minto trap has been discontinued for the season. Prospects should still be good, however, in the Packsaddle and Minto areas. Reports have also been received of a few bright summer steelhead being taken between Fishermen's Bend and Mehama. Last week marked the end of this season's summer steelhead recycling in the South Santiam from the Foster Dam trap. Anglers can receive recorded updates on Foster trap counts and recycling activities by calling 541-367-3437.

SANDY RIVER: coho, steelhead,

Fishing on the Sandy River near the mouth of Cedar Creek is "smoking' hot" right now with 30-40 anglers coming out with the daily limit of three ad-clipped coho. River conditions are ideal and it appears another strong run is returning to Sandy Hatchery this year. Flow in the mainstem river is higher in the reach between the former Marmot Dam and the mouth of the Bull Run (where the mouth of Cedar Creek is located) due to removal of the dam and the end of water diversions out of the mainstem and into the Bull Run.

It appears coho are now able to migrate farther upstream without the onset of fall rains leading to good numbers of fresh, bright coho available to anglers. With another good run of coho expected fishing should hold up well into October, particularly when the fall rains arrive.

Mainstem Sandy River water levels are still low and boaters need to watch for submerged logs and rocks. The river has been running fairly clear throughout most days. Monday's readings showed flows down to 481 cfs (7.94') with the water temperature holding near 54°.

Anglers can access the river from many parks including Lewis and Clark, Dabney, Oxbow, and Dodge. Bank access is also available to the Cedar Creek area at the Sandy Hatchery. When fishing the Oxbow Park area, remember that there is no angling from a floating device upstream from a point that is 200 feet below the Oxbow Park boat ramp.

Collection/recycling receptacles for discarded or lost fishing gear can now be found along the Sandy River. Look for them near boat ramps at Lewis and Clark, Dabney, Oxbow, and Dodge parks. Any tangled fishing line or old gear can be collected and disposed of in these canisters as an effort to maintain a healthy, clean Sandy River. Please use nearby garbage cans for any other types of trash.

WALLING POND: rainbow trout

Was recently stocked with 150 jumbo-sized (1-1.5 lbs each) trout.

WALTER WIRTH POND: rainbow trout

Was recently stocked with 350 jumbo-sized (1-1.5 lbs each) trout.

WILLAMETTE RIVER: sturgeon, steelhead, warmwater species

Fish passage at Willamette Falls was partially restored this week after a major phase of the fishway maintenance project by Portland General Electric was completed. Coho immediately began moving upstream in substantial numbers with 273 adults and 314 jacks passing the first day. Through Wednesday, coho passage totals were 869 adults and 915 jacks over this three day period. A large number of jacks is also being observed in other areas of the North Willamette, and appears to support theories predicting a large return of coho above Willamette Falls next year.

A few boat fishermen reported catching coho in the Willamette near the mouth of the Clackamas over the weekend. The word is that fish have been rolling but reluctant to bite.

Anglers have directed most of their effort towards white sturgeon, with a few warmwater anglers in the lower Willamette. Coho are available near the mouth of the Clackamas along Meldrum Bar. Boat anglers that have had the best success for coho seem to be working the mainstem Willamette in the Gladstone to Oregon City area.

The Sept. 29 conditions showed Willamette flows at 9,700 cfs, a water temperature reading steady at 60°, and the visibility holding at a very clear 6.8 feet.

The sturgeon catch has been slow in most sections of the lower Willamette. From the lower Portland Harbor near St Johns up through the Milwaukie/Oregon City area sublegal sturgeon are providing much of the catch. There have been a few keepers reported in the catch. Bank fishing for sturgeon can be found at Meldrum Bar and at the wall in downtown Oregon City. Sturgeon anglers have been using frozen smelt, shad, or herring as effective bait.

Anglers are reminded that the Willamette provides an excellent warm water fishery in the summer and early fall months. You can expect to find an abundance of bass, crappie, and bluegill available. Target the rocky outcroppings, structures, or old pilings. Casting a variety of plugs or jigs near the shoreline can be successful. A simple bobber and night crawler might prove to be the right choice also. The local tackle shops can set you up with the right gear and direct you to the best spots.

HIGH LAKES:

There are many mountain lakes available in the area for day use or overnight camping that require only a short hike in to them. The remoteness of the lake will usually dictate the degree of difficulty of the hike. Be prepared for cool nights as the fall season arrives. Early season snowfall is not unheard of. The high lakes have been aerial stocked and provide an angling experience unlike the more crowded, close-in waters. Bank fishing or float-tubes are the way to fish on these small mountain lakes, with the greatest chances for success likely to be found by fishing in mornings and evenings. Please be aware of current campfire rules as extreme fire conditions continue to grip much of the state. Of course always pack out what you pack in. Maps should be available at the local U.S. Forest Service office. Check the Willamette stocking schedules for a list of high lakes that are stocked by ODFW.

WILLAMETTE ZONE HUNTING

OPEN: Western Oregon deer (opens Oct. 4), fee pheasant hunting (at Fern Ridge and EE Wilson wildlife areas), forest grouse, California and mountain quail, crow (opens Oct. 1), bear, cougar.

Visit the Region's Fall Hunting Forecast

Remember to check with Ore. Dept. of Forestry, the Forest Service, BLM or other land managers about fire restrictions before going hunting; restrictions can change suddenly. Be prepared for fire season by having all of the required fire tools in your vehicle. Check with your local Oregon Department of Forestry office for advice on the proper fire tools to have.

DEER - Western Oregon Rifle Deer season opens on October 4. Hunters are reminded that fire danger is still high in many areas. Hunters are urged to use caution. Access may be restricted due to the fire danger. Please remember that you must have permission to hunt on private lands. Early weather forecasts are calling for the possibility of moisture which may help ease fire danger and improve hunting conditions. Hunters should look to hunt areas with abundant forage in the early mornings and late evenings. During the heat of the day the deer may not be real active. Look to hunt bedding areas in the timber and brush adjacent to the forage areas. On public lands these areas can be found around old cuts at higher elevations or recovering wildfire areas. On private lands look for areas that have had timber harvest within the last 3 to 10 years.

Fern Ridge Wildlife Area Western Oregon Fee Pheasant Hunt Program opened Sept. 8 and continues through Oct. 5. Open areas are the East Coyote, West Coyote, Fisher Butte, and Royal Amazon units. An $11.50 fee pheasant tag is required to participate in the hunt, and each tag will allow harvest of 2 rooster pheasants. Multiple tags may be purchased throughout the season however the daily bag limit is not to exceed two rooster pheasants. Morning shooting hours for the fee pheasant hunt program start according to time listed in Game Bird Regulation booklet and ends at 5 p.m. each day. All other authorized hunting on the wildlife area ends according to shooting hours table in Game Bird Regulation booklet. Non-toxic shot required for all game bird hunting on the wildlife area. Hunters are required to check in and out at wildlife area hunter check stations when hunting in the four units mentioned above. Pheasant stocks will be replenished four times a week in lots ranging from 50 to 70 birds. Fern Ridge Wildlife Area headquarters is located at 26969 Cantrell Road, Eugene, OR 97402. For more information, call the wildlife area at 541 935 2591.

COUGAR hunting is tough during this time of the year and most cougar will be harvested by people out pursuing other big game species. Hunters report that cougar can be attracted into bow or rifle range by using elk calls. If you use this technique be prepared because cougar can respond quickly. Find your shooting lanes and set up accordingly. Hunters headed for the northern end of the Willamette Valley to hunt cougar should concentrate their efforts in the Cascade Mountains. Dry weather conditions will concentrate the cougars prey species where food sources are more abundant and palatable such as around lakes, ponds, streams and wetlands. Hunters should spend time scouting these areas to increase their opportunity for success. In the South Willamette Watershed cougars can be found throughout the area with the exception of the Willamette Valley Floor. Remember cougars must be checked in at an ODFW office within 10 days of harvest.

The general fall BLACK BEAR season is open, and check-in of harvested black bears is increasing. Huckleberries are ripening in the Cascades and bears can be found nearby. Hunters need to find the more isolated patches of berries where bears are not disturbed by human activities. Be there early and stay late for the best chances to find a feeding bear. Hunters are now required to check-in the skulls of any bears harvested. Notify your local district ODFW office to set up an appointment to ensure that can complete the check-in within the required 10 day period. Make sure the skull of bear is thawed before you bring it in.

For hunters wanting to be more mobile and explore new areas away from berry patches, their best success would be using predator calls. Bears tend to respond best when hunters use a constant calling strategy. It can take a long time for a bear to respond to a predator call and hunters are advised to spend up to an hour at each calling location. Hunters are also advised to hunt with a partner when using predator calls. These are large animals that are expecting a meal when they arrive, so use caution.

GROUSE and QUAIL hunting has been slow due to the poor chick production this year and the overall low numbers of adult birds available. Hunters will need to thoroughly cover large amounts of preferred habitat to find these scattered grouse and quail. A well trained dog will greatly improve your odds in locating and flushing birds.

EE WILSON WILDLIFE AREA

This week ODFW staff released 190 pheasants on the 1,788-acre wildlife area. Western Oregon fee pheasant hunting opens Oct. 1 and continues through Oct. 31. To participate in these hunts, each hunter must have in possession a valid hunting license, upland game bird validation, HIP validation and a $11.50 fee pheasant tag. The bag limit is two birds. Hunters are reminded to use non-toxic shot and carry an ink pen in the field so they can validate their tags as soon as they have their pheasant in hand. Hunting begins at normal shooting hours as described on Page 13 of the 2008-09 Game Bird Regulations and ends at 5 p.m.

For more information, call the Wildlife area at (541) 745-5334. EE Wilson Wildlife Area is located approximately 10 miles north of Corvallis on Hwy. 99W. The address is 29555 Camp Adair Road, Monmouth, OR 97361.

The past two weekends of youth pheasant hunts were deemed a big success, with 214 youth hunters from five states participating in the event, including 42 first-time hunters.

ODFW continues to take public comments on the draft management plan for EE Wilson. Email comments to ODFW.Comments@state.or.us

SAUVIE ISLAND WILDLIFE AREA

Duck hunting opens next weekend.

WILLAMETTE ZONE VIEWING

Corvallis Area

EE Wilson Wildlife Area

Visit the Wildlife Area after 5 p.m. in October for the best wildlife viewing. Hunting in October ends at 5 p.m. so viewers have the area to themselves. Look and listen for songbirds and game birds-quail, doves and pheasants. There should be deer to see at dusk and last week viewers enjoyed watching a river otter.

Waterfowl and shorebirds are scare but as soon as the wet weather comes, their numbers will start to build.

From Albany, take Highway 20 toward Corvallis and after 5 miles turn right on Independence Highway. Go 3 miles and turn left on Camp Adair Road, then proceed 2 miles to the wildlife area. Find directions to EE Wilson Wildlife Area.

Eugene/Springfield Area

Salmon Spawning Now

Salmon have one of the most interesting life cycles of any fish on earth. Visit ODFW's hatcheries in the Springfield area to view this amazing event.

Leaburg Hatchery

Spring chinook salmon are currently spawning in the McKenzie River. One easy place to view the salmon during this spawning ritual is in front of Leaburg Hatchery. Directions.

Willamette Hatchery

Adult spring chinook salmon are easily seen at McKenzie and Willamette hatcheries. Please remember to be respectful of the spawning fish and to observe the salmon quietly, without disturbing them. Willamette Hatchery directions.

Fern Ridge Wildlife Area

Fern Ridge Wildlife Area is open daily for public use providing great wildlife viewing opportunities.

Observant visitors may catch a glimpse of black tailed deer and furbearers including beaver and otter, mink, red fox and coyotes. Some of the unusual and special bird species to be on the lookout for include white pelicans, black terns, band-tailed pigeons, yellow-headed blackbirds, osprey and bald eagles. This is a great time of year to look for waterfowl, shore birds, wading birds, songbirds, raptors, reptiles, and amphibians.

There is an elevated viewing platform in the Fisher Butte unit just south of Royal Avenue that is open year-round. A second viewing platform is located 1/4 mile north of the Fisher Butte unit parking lot on Hwy 126.

Visitors are cautioned that there have been recent vehicle break-ins at Fern Ridge and in local parks, so please secure your valuables before departing your vehicle. Parking areas are located along Highway 126, Nielson Road, Cantrell Road, Territorial Road, and Clear Lake Road. Contact the wildlife area headquarters, (541) 935-2591 if you have any questions.

Directions to Fern Ridge Wildlife Area.

Portland Area

Audubon Nature Sanctuary, Forest Park

Nestled against Forest Park, five minutes from downtown Portland, is Audubon's 150-acre, free-to-the-public Nature Sanctuary-a showcase for native flora and fauna. It has over four miles of forested hiking trails for you to enjoy year 'round. More information. Trails are open dawn to dusk every day. Get directions.

Salem Area

Silver Creek Falls State Park

There are lots of birds to see and hear including American dippers and mountain quail. Listen for owls in the evening. See the Silver Falls State Park Web site for directions, maps and a bird list, http://www.oregonstateparks.org/park_211.php

Sauvie Island

Sauvie Island Wildlife Area

Fall is a good time to see pled-billed grebes, great blue herons, American bitterns, 20 different species of swans, geese and ducks, as well as hawks, ospreys, owls, and scores of other birds. Sauvie Island Wildlife

The best viewing opportunities are at Coon Point, Oak Island Nature Trail, Eastside Viewing Platform and Rentenaar Road.

Dogs are welcome on the Wildlife Area but must be kept on leash at all times.

Sauvie Island Wildlife Area is located on Sauvie Island, only 10 miles north of Portland off Highway 30. Approximately 12,000 acres are under management by the Oregon Department of Fishing Wildlife. A parking permit is required for the Sauvie Island Wildlife Area and can be purchased at ODFW Point of Sale vendors or at the Sauvie Island ODFW office, Monday through Friday during office hours.

For more information, call (503) 621-3488.

Directions to Sauvie Island Wildlife Area

Teaching the salmon life cycle to kids

Visit the Eagle Canyon exhibit at the Oregon Zoo, http://www.oregonzoo.org/Exhibits/GreatNW/EagleCanyon/salmon.htm

Download a color book created for kids by the USFWS, http://www.piercecountywa.org/xml/services/home/environ/ed/life%20cycle%20of%20a%20salmon.pdf

NORTHWEST ZONE

FISHING

The ODFW Commission recently adopted several changes to angling regulations. Anglers are reminded these regulations do not take affect until 2009.

" Rains are forecasted for the north coast. Rivers are expected to rise. Salmon will be moving upstream and fishing should improve in upstream areas.

" Sea-run cutthroat (blue backs) can be found in good numbers in tidewater and much of the mainstem Siuslaw river.

" Fall chinook fishing in the Yaquina River tidewater is fair but expect it to pick up over the next couple weeks or with the next good rain event.

NORTH COAST LAKES

Cape Meares, Town, Coffenbury, Lost and Sunset lakes were stocked with trophy size trout the week of Sept. 15. Trout stocking is now complete for this year.

Angling for warm water species, particularly largemouth bass should be is slowing down as lakes cool off. Town, Cape Meares, Lytle, Coffenbury, Cullaby and Sunset lakes, and Vernonia Pond have reasonable populations of bass. Lower Columbia River backwaters and sloughs also provide some opportunity for warm water species.

MID COAST LAKES

Stocking rainbow trout for the mid coast lakes has ended for the season. Most water bodies had a final stocking in late May or the first week in June. Fishing will remain fair to good at most locations through the summer.

WARM WATER FISH ANGLING OPPORTUNITIES

The Mid Coast has numerous lakes or reservoirs which offer good angling for naturally produced warm water fish species, such as large mouth bass, yellow perch, bluegill, brown bullhead and crappie. Typically the best fishing is from late spring to mid fall while water temperatures are warm. Tactics such as casting or trolling lures, jigging baits near bottom or using the traditional bait and bobber technique are all productive from either a boat or from shore. Below is a list of lakes near local coastal cities that offer warm water angling opportunities.

Devils Lake (Lincoln City): Offers fair to good year-round trout fishing and also has slow to fair angling for largemouth bass, yellow perch and bluegill.

Big Creek Reservoirs 1 & 2 (Newport): Offers fair largemouth bass fishing, slow to fair angling for yellow perch and bluegill and good year-round angling for rainbow and cutthroat trout.

Olalla Reservoir (Toledo): Offers fair largemouth bass fishing, slow to fair angling for yellow perch, bluegill and brown bullhead and good year-round angling for rainbow and cutthroat trout.

Sutton and Mercer Lakes (northern Florence): Fair to good angling for largemouth bass and decent angling for bluegill, and potential for crappie and brown bullhead. Offers year-round rainbow and cutthroat trout fishing.

Woahink Lake (southern Florence): Can be good to very good for yellow perch and offers fair to good angling for largemouth bass and bluegill.

Siltcoos Lake (south of Florence): A large lake with numerous fingers, lots of shoreline structure and a couple large tributaries. Offers fair to good angling for largemouth bass, bluegill, yellow perch and brown bullhead. There is good year-round rainbow and cutthroat trout fishing and a good seasonal fishery for coho salmon.

Tahkenitch Lake (south of Florence): A large lake with numerous fingers, lots of shoreline structure and a couple large tributaries. Offers good to very good angling for largemouth bass and yellow perch, and fair to good angling for bluegill, crappie and brown bullhead. There is good year-round cutthroat trout fishing and a good seasonal fishery for coho salmon.

ALSEA RIVER: chinook salmon, cutthroat trout

Fall chinook salmon can be found in the bay up through tidewater. Catch rates have been slow and sporadic but should pick up with forecasted rain this week. Trolling has been the most effective in the bay and lower tidewater. Anglers are reminded of the temporary rules for 2008 fall chinook angling, the combined bag limit for non-fin clipped adult chinook is one daily and five per season in the aggregate for all open ocean terminal areas and rivers.

Sea-run cutthroat (blue backs) can be found in tide water with most having moved up into the mainstem river in fair to good numbers. Resident cutthroat trout can be found throughout the river and has been good angling. Concentrate at the lower end of riffles or in pools. Using small spinners, spoons or flies is productive and floating dry flies can be action packed.

Current river levels

NECANICUM RIVER: cutthroat, chinook

Sea-run cutthroat angling (catch and release) should be fair to good. Use small lures or flies in the riffles or pools near some cover. A few fall chinook are showing up in tidewater. Upcoming rains should move fish upstream.

NEHALEM RIVER AND BAY: chinook, cutthroat

Fall chinook and hatchery coho are being caught in the bay and tidewater areas. Some good bites have been reported on occasion. A few coho have ascended the north fork, but water levels are very low. Trolling herring near the bottom is productive in the lower bay; bobber and eggs are commonly used in the upper tidewater areas. Sea-run cutthroat fishing should be good in tidewater areas and upstream. Casting or trolling small lures or flies in tidewater areas is productive.

NESTUCCA RIVER: steelhead, cutthroat trout, chinook

Angling for summer steelhead has been slow to fair. Best catches have come in the early morning or late evening. Catch-and-release angling for cutthroat should be fair to good, with sea-run cutthroat available in much of the river system. Fall chinook angling in the lower bay is slow to fair. Angling for salmon and steelhead in upstream areas should improve with the forecasted wet weather pattern.

SALMON RIVER: chinook salmon, coho salmon, and cutthroat trout

Chinook salmon and hatchery run coho salmon are showing up in fair numbers in tide water. Catch rates have been slow to fair with sporadic good bites. The fishery should pick up with forecasted rain this week. Sea-run cutthroat trout can be found in tide water with most up in the main stem river. Resident cutthroat trout can be found through out the river. Anglers should concentrate in pools or shaded areas. Casting spinners and spoons or drifting small flies can be productive. Using dry flies is more challenging but can have great results.

SILETZ RIVER: chinook salmon, summer steelhead, cutthroat trout

Fall chinook salmon fishing in the lower bay through tide water has been slow with a few random good bites reported. The fishery should pick up with forecasted rain this week. Anglers are reminded of the temporary rules for 2008 fall chinook angling, the combined bag limit for non-fin clipped adult chinook is one daily and five per season in the aggregate for all open ocean terminal areas and rivers.

Summer steelhead fishing has been slow as river conditions are low and clear. Catch rates should pick up any time now as rain is in the forecast and river temperatures are dropping. Hatchery fish have been recycled back downstream. These fish have a plastic tag near the dorsal fin. Please report tagged fish to the Newport Office (541-867-4741). Sea-run cutthroat trout can be found in fair to good numbers from tide water well up into the main stem river. Resident cutthroat trout can be found in good numbers throughout the basin. Casting or drifting small lures, flies or bait can be productive.

SIUSLAW RIVER: chinook salmon, cutthroat trout

Fall chinook salmon fishing in the bay through tidewater has been slow to fair with reports of a few good bites. Catch rates should increase as more fish are moving into the bay and rain is in the forecast. Trolling herring, large spinners or Kwikfish typically works well. Anglers are reminded of the temporary rules for 2008 fall chinook angling, the combined bag limit for non-fin clipped adult chinook is one daily and five per season in the aggregate for all open ocean terminal areas and rivers.

Sea-run cutthroat (blue backs) can be found in good numbers from upper tide water through much of the mainstem river. Trolling in tidewater is productive but casting or drifting small lures and flies in the river can be very good. Resident cutthroat trout can be found in good numbers throughout the basin.

TILLAMOOK BAY: coho, chinook salmon

Hatchery coho and fall chinook are available throughout the bay. Fishing for salmon has been generally been fair, with some good bites reported. The ocean terminal area off the mouth of Tillamook Bay has been fair for chinook.

TRASK RIVER: coho, steelhead, cutthroat trout, chinook

Summer steelhead angling is slow to fair. Catch and release angling for cutthroat should be fair to good. Concentrate on the lower river or tidewater for fresh sea-run cutthroat. A few hatchery coho have entered the lower river up to the hatchery. Fall chinook angling is fair. Most fish are in tidewater, but are expected to move upstream with wet weather on the horizon.

Johnson Bridge is being replaced. Boaters should use extreme caution when approaching the bridge site. Passage at the work site will be provided.

WILSON RIVER: steelhead, cutthroat trout, chinook

Angling for steelhead has been slow to fair. Best fishing is likely to be higher in the system. Catch-and-release angling for cutthroat trout should be fair to good. Sea-run cutthroat are available from tidewater upstream. Fall chinook should begin moving upstream when the wet weather arrives. Until then, best fishing will be in tidewater areas.

The Siskeyville boat slide is under construction. The boat slide will be closed until further notice. Completion is expected by the end of September.

YAQUINA RIVER: chinook salmon, cutthroat trout

Fall chinook salmon fishing in the lower bay up to Toledo has been slow to fair with a few good reports from anglers recently. The fishery is anticipated to pick up through tidewater over the next couple weeks or next good rain event. Anglers are reminded of the temporary rules for 2008 fall chinook angling, the combined bag limit for non-fin clipped adult chinook is one daily and five per season in the aggregate for all open ocean terminal areas and rivers.

Cutthroat trout fishing is fair to good throughout the basin and good numbers of sea-run cutthroat can be found in upper tidewater and the lower river areas. Trolling in tidewater has been productive, as well as, casting or drifting small lures and flies in the lower river.

Current river levels for major north coast streams

NORTH COAST HUNTING

OPEN: Western Oregon deer (opens Oct. 4), forest grouse, California and mountain quail, crow (opens Oct. 1), bear, cougar

Visit the NW Fall Hunting Forecast.

Remember to check with Ore. Dept. of Forestry, the Forest Service, BLM or other land managers about fire restrictions before going hunting; restrictions can change suddenly.

DEER on the north coast appear to have survived the tougher winter well so hunting should be about average. Deer numbers are generally modest, but with excellent buck escapement from last year's seasons. Recent rains and cooler temperatures have lessened fire danger and opened more private timber lands. Know whose land you want to access and check their policies first. The toll-free recreational access hotline in Oregon is 1-888-741-5403.

Hunting for FOREST GROUSE and QUAIL is likely to be below average this year due to cold, wet weather during much of the nesting season. Grouse numbers appear to be rather low, but mountain quail seemed to be about average. Look for mountain quail on brushy clear-cut areas, especially on south-facing slopes. Ruffed grouse are most commonly found on mid-slopes and along riparian areas, whereas blue grouse tend to occur higher up on ridge tops. It appears that bird numbers in the eastern part of the coast range are better than to the west.

Densities of COUGAR are relatively low on the north coast, and the animals are hard to find unless you specifically target them. One of the most effective ways to hunt them is by using a predator call. An aggressive calling strategy works best on these shy and reclusive cats. Remember cougars must be checked-in no more than 10 days after harvest at an ODFW office.

BLACK BEAR have been very active on the north coast this summer. While earlier berry crops like salmonberry and thimbleberry were sparse and late, the later ones such as salal, huckleberry, blackcap and Himalaya berry are plentiful. Travels in the higher elevations of the coast range have revealed bumper crops of wild huckleberries, blackcaps and other native berries. Hunting for bears in these areas, especially in clearcuts, should be productive. Like with cougar, an aggressive calling strategy works best if you are actively hunting bears. Reminder: starting this year, successful bear hunters must now check in their bear at an ODFW office no more than 10 days after harvesting one. See our website or call an ODFW office for details.

NORTHWEST ZONE VIEWING

Jewell Meadows Wildlife Area

Bull elk continue to bugle and battle for dominance with other males at the rut winds down. The breeding activity should continue through early of October. Viewers are encouraged to listen for bugling and clashing of antlers especially at dusk, when elk are becoming more active. Visitors are reminded that areas posted as Wildlife Refuge are closed to entry.

Recent elk viewing has been limited to the last two hours of daylight in the evenings and the first hour or so in the mornings. As the days begin to get shorter and the weather begins to cool down, elk should be more visible during the daylight hours.

Band-tailed pigeons should have mostly departed for warmer climes by now, but a variety of songbirds is visible near the bird feeders at most viewing areas.

For information and directions, visit the ODFW Web site Visitors' Guide.

SOUTHWEST ZONE

FISHING

Weekend fishing opportunities

* The Chetco River fall chinook ocean terminal fishery opens Oct. 1 and runs through Oct. 4. Anglers can expect excellent fishing for some the coast's largest salmon. Anglers are reminded that Chinook fishing on the Chetco River is closed until Nov. 1 .

* Rains this week should get the chinook stirring around the mouths of both the Sixes and Elk Rivers.

* Crabbing has been good in Coos Bay and Coquille Estuary near Bandon.

* Several lakes and reservoirs in the zone were stocked with trophy trout last week including Applegate and Lost Creek reservoirs, and Fish, Hyatt and Willow lakes and anglers are reporting catches of these trophy-sized fish.

AGATE RESERVOIR: largemouth bass, bluegill, crappie

Angling for bass, bluegill and crappie has been fair.

APPLEGATE RESERVOIR: trout, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass

Applegate was stocked with 900 trophy trout last week. Angling for smallmouth bass has been good. Anglers have reported catches of trophy trout trolling wedding rings and other lures in moderately deep water.

ARIZONA POND: trout

Located half-way between Gold Beach and Port Orford at the Oregon State Park's newly acquired property. Shore access is excellent. Anglers will want to fish with a bobber or some type of float to keep bait off the bottom and out of the weeds. The water levels in the pond have been lowered for weed control.

BABYFOOT LAKE: rainbow trout, bass

The lake is located in the Kalmiopsis Wilderness outside of Cave Junction. Anglers should contact the USFS in Cave Junction for maps and road conditions.

BEN IRVING RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, bass

Ben Irving Reservoir, west of Winston, has been stocked with about 4,000 trout to date.

CHETCO RIVER: chinook salmon

The Chetco River fall chinook ocean terminal fishery opens Oct. 1 and runs through Oct. 4. Anglers can expect some excellent fishing for some the coast's largest salmon. This fishery is in the ocean and anglers are reminded to check the regulations and terminal fishery boundaries before fishing. Anglers are reminded that the Chetco River is closed to chinook fishing until Nov. 1.

COOPER CREEK RESERVOIR: rainbow trout

Cooper Creek has been stocked with about 9,000 catchable trout to date. The reservoir also received some trophy sized trout in February and then again in early June. One lucky angler caught a 9 pound trout out of Cooper Creek that was probably left over from a year ago. Nearby Plat I reservoir has also been stocked with about 3,000 catchable trout.

COOS RIVER BASIN: chinook salmon, Dungeness crab

Chinook fishing in Coos Bay has been slow the past week. The chinook are spread throughout Coos Bay. Trolling spinners or herring is an effective way to catch chinook. A good place to fish from shore is along the boardwalk in downtown Coos Bay. Throw spinners or bait under a bobber to catch chinook here. Remember emergency fall chinook salmon regulations began August 1 and continue through December 31, 2008. Check the ODFW website or contact the local ODFW office for these emergency regulations.

Crabbing has been good in Coos Bay. The best crabbing areas are near Charleston and the jetties. Legal Dungeness crabs have also been caught off the docks in the Charleston Marina. The best baits for crabbing are fish, chicken or turkey legs.

COQUILLE RIVER BASIN: chinook salmon, Dungeness crab

Chinook fishing is picking up in the Coquille River. Chinook are spread throughout the river from Bullards Beach Boat Ramp to Myrtle Point. Bouncing eggs or trolling spinners or herring are the preferred ways to catch chinook. Another area to fish for chinook is around the Bandon Marina and near the mouth of Ferry Creek. There should be chinook returning to these areas are from our acclimation site on lower Ferry Creek. Anglers should make sure to fish in areas that are safe and where they have permission to fish. Emergency fall chinook salmon regulations began August 1 and continue through December 31, 2008. Check the ODFW website or contact the local ODFW office for these emergency regulations.

Crabbing has been good in the Coquille Estuary around Bandon. Legal Dungeness crabs are being caught from boats and the docks in Bandon. The best baits for crabbing are fish, chicken or turkey legs.

DIAMOND LAKE: rainbow trout

Fishing has been good, but anglers are having to spend some time on the lake to achieve their limits. Many people are catching trout in the 14 to 17 inch size and some people catching trout in the 20-inch size range. The lake has turned over and mixed so fall fishing should pick up soon with good insect hatches. All methods of fishing have brought in limits and large fish recently including bait, lures and flies.

Using live bait fish is illegal in Oregon's fresh waters. If anyone observes an angler using or possessing live bait fish, please record as much information as possible such as a description of the person, the boat number, description of the boat or vehicle license plate and contact Oregon State Police immediately at 541-440-3334.

Anglers are reminded the boat speed limit will be 10 mph all day. This is the same speed limit as in the past prior to the negative impact of the tui chub. In addition to the 50,000 carry over fish from 2007 which are now 12 - 15 inches long, ODFW has stocked about 77,600 catchable or larger trout in Diamond Lake including some larger trophy trout. Fishing should improve as fall approaches. Highway 138 from Roseburg to Diamond Lake was re-opened Sept. 21.

ELK/SIXES RIVER: chinook

Rains this week should get the chinook stirring around the mouths of both the Sixes and Elk Rivers. Chinook fishing will continue to get better through October, with November being the best month.

EMIGRANT RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, crappie

Little pressure has been reported at Emigrant. Some stocked rainbows are still available. Fishing can be good for smallmouth and largemouth bass in September and October. Anglers should fish structure, the dam face and dike structures in Emigrant and Hill Creek arms.

Anglers should be aware that recent testing by the Department of Human Services has found elevated levels of mercury in smallmouth bass at Emigrant, and a health advisory has been issued recommending limits on consumption of all fish from Emigrant except rainbow trout. Information on the Emigrant Reservoir advisory, along with general information on mercury and fish can be found on the DHS Web site.

EXPO POND: rainbow trout

Angling for bass and panfish has been good. Fishing bait, either from a bobber or on the bottom with weight, can be effective. The pond is located immediately adjacent to the access road at Gate 5 at the fairgrounds.

FISH LAKE: rainbow trout

Fish Lake was stocked with 900 trophy trout last week and anglers are having success on these fish. Both bank and boat anglers have done well with a variety of techniques. Fly anglers have also been able to catch trophy-sized fish. Brook trout are also available in Fish Lake and fishing for them can be productive in September and October as they are preparing to spawn and become more aggressive.

GALESVILLE RESERVIOR: rainbow trout, bass

Galesville Reservoir is open to angling year-round. Galesville has been stocked with about 8,000 catchable size trout to date and the 25,000 sub-legal size trout stocked last fall are now legal-sized. Some anglers report seeing external "worms" on a few of the trout or in their gills. These are copepods, a fish parasite, which occur naturally throughout the watershed. The copepods can be removed and the fish safely consumed. Galesville was stocked in June with about 55,000 adipose-clipped hatchery coho which are now legal size. In Galesville Reservoir, all landlocked salmon are considered trout. Thus, there is a 5 per day trout limit, with only one trout over 20 inches in length allowed for harvest. Trout fishing should pick up as water cools this fall. Anglers are reminded all bass between 12 and 15 inches must be released, and only one bass over 15 inches may be taken per day.

GARRISON LAKE: rainbow trout, bass

Anglers can expect good trout fishing through late fall. Bank access is limited to the State Park along the foredune or 12th street boat ramp. Anglers should keep an eye on the weather and target the lake when winds are light.

HERBERT'S POND: rainbow trout, warm water fish

Herbert's Pond is a small pond just east of Canyonville on Tiller Highway. The pond has a good warm water fishery for kids including bluegill, crappie, and bass. The pond was stocked with a couple hundred trout in early June to provide some additional fishing opportunity while the pond is still cool enough to keep the trout healthy. The pond has very good bank access.

HOWARD PRAIRIE RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass

Howard Prairie has been stocked with legal-sized rainbow trout. Fishing for them has been fair. The trout are well distributed throughout the lake. Anglers using PowerBait have recently reported good catches of nice sized trout in the Redrock area. Trolling has been less effective than still fishing with PowerBait.

HYATT LAKE: rainbow trout, largemouth bass

Hyatt Lake was stocked with 450 large trout last week, which are being caught throughout the lake. The Orchard has been a productive spot. Largemouth bass are moving into the shallows and angling for them has been good. Hyatt Lake has an abundance of small bass that offer good opportunities for new anglers to catch a good number of fish.

LAIRD LAKE: trout

Laird Lake is located approximately 25 miles up Elk River. Most anglers fish from the bank with fly rods or small spinning rods.

LAKE MARIE: rainbow trout

Lake Marie is at Umpqua Lighthouse State Park near Winchester. The lake has already been stocked with 4,000 trout.

LAKE SELMAC: rainbow trout

Casting and retrieving lures or flies is effective, as is trolling lures or flies from a boat. Fishing for largemouth bass and panfish has been good. Big bass may move into deeper water during daylight hours, but as fall approaches look for bass fishing to pick up in all areas of the lake.

LEMOLO RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, brown trout

Lemolo Lake has been stocked with about 5,000 catchable trout plus some trophy-sized rainbow trout to date. A few weeks ago, 1,500 trophy trout were stocked. Anglers have been successful at catching both rainbow and brown trout. The boat ramp at Poole Creek has been repaired to improve boat access. Highway 138 was re-opened on Sept. 21, but call ahead if unsure of road closures.

LOON LAKE: rainbow trout

Loon Lake has been stocked with about 7,000 catchable trout plus some trophy trout to date. In addition, there were almost 6,000 sub-legal trout stocked last fall that are now 8 inches long for legal for harvest.

LOST CREEK RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass

Lost Creek Reservoir was stocked with 600 trophy trout last week. Pressure at Lost Creek has been light, but anglers fishing Lost Creek are having some success. Trolling seems most effective but bank anglers are also catching some fish. Bank anglers primarily fish either floating bait or worms. Boat anglers use a wide variety of techniques. Trollers often fish wedding ring and night crawler combinations behind a weight, while fly anglers can have success both trolling and casting. Angling for smallmouth bass has been fair to good.

MEDCO POND: rainbow trout, largemouth bass, panfish

Fishing bass and panfish has been fair.

PACIFIC OCEAN AND BEACHES: bottomfish

Rockfish daily bag limit has returned to six fish and is open to the 40-fathom line. Sport anglers may still retain two lingcod but cabezon may no longer be retained by boat anglers.

REINHART PARK POND: trout, warmwater fish

Largemouth bass and bluegill are available. Trout are hitting worms and floating baits. The bass and bluegill will take worms or a variety lures.

ROGUE RIVER, LOWER: chinook, steelhead (slow), coho, crab

The Rogue Bay and lower river are turning out coho and Chinook. The fishing is not red hot, but anglers are reporting some pretty good fishing days. Anchovies are still the number one bait in the bay. Anglers fishing up river are side drifting salmon eggs, casting spinners or fly fishing.

Rogue River flows

ROGUE RIVER, MIDDLE: trout, steelhead

Summer steelhead fishing is picking up as fall approaches. Try crawdad plugs, spinners and glowbugs. For bait fishers, side drifting small balls of roe is effective. Small lures may be the best bet. Fly anglers may have success fishing riffles in mornings and evenings. More summer steelhead are expected to push up river in coming weeks and fishing will likely improve. The flow at Grants Pass on Sept. 29 was 1290 cubic feet per second. Lower flows will make it easier to pinpoint where fish are holding.

From Aug. 1 through Dec. 31, between Elephant Rock and Hog Creek boat landing, no more than two adult non-adipose fin-clipped chinook may be kept per day as part of the daily limit. No more than 10 non-adipose finclipped chinook may be kept per year with five applying to the SW zone aggregate. Beginning Oct. 1 until Dec. 31, Hog Creek boat landing to Gold Ray Dam is closed to chinook fishing.

ROGUE RIVER, UPPER: trout, steelhead

As of Sept. 29, the flow out of William Jess Dam (Lost Creek) was 1020 cfs and the outflow temperature was 48 degrees. As of Sept. 22, 3056 summer steelhead have been counted at Gold Ray Dam. Angling for chinook is now closed above Gold Ray. From September 1 to October 31, angling between Gold Ray Dam to Cole Rivers Hatchery, is restricted to artificial flies only. Consult the regulations for more information. Steelhead fishers have reported mixed results. Some anglers have had good days while for others action has been very slow. Fishing will still probably be best in morning and evening and on cloudy days. Trout fishing has been good and can be a great activity between morning and evening steelhead sessions. Pressure has been light to moderate.

Emergency harvest restrictions were enacted on the Rogue River to protect wild spring chinook salmon due low numbers of adults returning to the river. As of Aug. 1, from Gold Ray Dam to Cole Rivers Hatchery is closed to chinook angling.

ROGUE RIVER (SECTION 5): rainbow trout

Section 5 of the Rogue River (upstream of Lost Creek Reservoir): Stocked rainbows are still available. Access has improved at Crater Creek. Check with the Prospect Ranger District regarding access to Hamaker Campground and Minnehaha Creek.

SODA SPRINGS RESERVOIR: brown and rainbow trout

Soda Springs Reservoir and the tributaries upstream are open for trout angling. Highway 138 is now open after the forest fire closure.

SMITH RIVER: striped bass, trout, fall chinook, steelhead

Open for adipose fin-clipped steelhead from mouth to Spencer Creek and North Fork from mouth upstream to Johnson Creek. Fall chinook season is open from mouth to Spencer Creek, but North Fork Smith is closed Aug 1-Dec 31 for fall chinook fishing as an emergency closure for 2008 (check for special regulations). Trout season closed Sept. 15. Striped bass season is open year-round, 2 fish per 24 hours, 30-inch minimum size. The North Fork is open from mouth to Johnson Creek for stripers.

SOUTH COAST STREAMS: trout

Trout season in the Umpqua tributaries, Smith River, South Umpqua, North Umpqua tributaries below Soda Springs Reservoir and Cow Creek basins closed Sept. 15. The mainstem Umpqua and mainstem North Umpqua to Soda Springs Dam are open year-round for catch and release trout. North Umpqua mainstem and tributarties above Soda Springs Reservoir remain open for trout angling until Oct. 31.

SOUTHARD LAKE: trout

Southard is a small lake accessible by trail. Anglers not familiar with the area should contact the USFS office in Gold Beach for maps and road conditions.

TENMILE BASIN: largemouth bass

Largemouth bass fishing has been good. Best time to fish is during the low light periods of the day. Use jigs, crankbaits, or plastic lures and concentrate your fishing efforts near structure.

TOKETEE LAKE: brown trout

Fishing is open in Toketee year-round, and the best fishing occurs early in the morning. The lake has both good bank and boat access throughout.

UMPQUA ESTUARY: sturgeon, bass, chinook, coho

Both sturgeon and striped bass fishing have been slow in the lower Umpqua. Angling for smallmouth bass has been good. Good numbers of chinook and coho have been caught off Osprey Point and Half Moon Bay by bank anglers.

UMPQUA HIGH LAKES AND FOREBAYS: trout

Diamond Lake and Lemolo are open for fishing. Clearwater Forebay #2 was stocked a few weeks ago with 400 trophy trout. Hemlock Lake was also stocked for Labor Day weekend with 1,400 trophy trout. Other high lakes such as Maidu, Bull Pup, Connie, Skookum, Calamut, Fuller, Wolf, Cliff, Buckeye, Linda, and Big Twin Lakes are now accessible for brook trout fishing and have been stocked this year. Highway 138 is re-opened as of Sept. 21.

UMPQUA RIVER MAINSTEM: steelhead, spring chinook

Remember the main stem Umpqua is closed to wild steelhead harvest, but remains open year-round for adipose fin-clipped steelhead. Open for adipose fin-clipped Coho Aug.1-Dec.31. Starting Aug.1, check special regulation for fall chinook.

UMPQUA RIVER, NORTH: steelhead

As of Aug. 31, 7,570 spring chinook, 1 coho, and 5,544 summer steelhead have passed Winchester Dam. Remember that only adipose fin-clipped steelhead can be harvested on the North Umpqua. The North is open to catch and release trout fishing from the mouth upstream to Soda Springs Dam. Season opened for adipose fin-clipped coho on Aug. 1. There will be few fin-clipped coho returning to the North Umpqua this year since the hatchery program was discontinued in 2005. There will still be fin-clipped coho in the mainstem Umpqua. The North closed to fall chinook fishing on July 31 and will not re-open until Jan. 1.

UMPQUA RIVER, SOUTH: smallmouth bass

The South Umpqua is now closed to all angling and will remain closed until winter steelhead season opens Dec. 1.

WILLOW LAKE: trout

Willow Lake was stocked with 250 trophy trout last week. Anglers should try using floating bait or worms. Casting and retrieving, or trolling lures or flies can also be effective. Angling is good for largemouth bass, crappie, and other warmwater fish. Look fore these species along the shore around structure.

WINCHESTER BAY: sturgeon, ocean coho

Fishing remains slow for sturgeon. Sport fishing for ocean coho is now closed. Angling for both coho and chinook opened on Aug. 1. Only fin-clipped coho can be harvested and only one, non-fin-clipped chinook per day, five per year can be harvested. See special regulations for more details.

RECREATIONAL SHELLFISH IS OPEN

The entire Oregon coast is open for recreational shellfishing. ALWAYS CHECK FOR HEALTH ADVISORIES by calling the Oregon Department of Agriculture's Shellfish line at 1-800-448-2474 for updates.

Razor clams and current status of particular areas

Crabbing has been a little slow but picked up recently. Crabbers are encouraged to return soft crabs with little meat back to the water. Crabbing from public docks or boat if available is a great opportunity for families to catch a delicious dinner. Kids often enjoy sorting out the smaller crab that can be abundant. Public crabbing docks can be found in Winchester Bay, Bandon, Charleston, and Empire.

Digging for clams in Coos Bay has been excellent. A few of the popular digging areas are Charleston Flat, Pigeon Point, Fossil Point and Clam Island.

" ALWAYS CHECK FOR HEALTH ADVISORIES by calling the Oregon Department of Agriculture's Shellfish line at 1-800-448-2474 for updates.

" Razor clams and current status of particular areas

" Bay clams

SOUTHWEST ZONE HUNTING

OPEN: Western Oregon deer (opens Oct. 4), forest grouse, California and mountain quail, bear, cougar, crow (opens Oct. 1)

RATTLE FIRE CLOSURES: Please check the Umpqua National Forest's web site at www.fs.fed.us/r6/umpqua for latest closure information.

Visit the SW Region Fall Hunting Forecast

Remember to check with Ore. Dept. of Forestry, the Forest Service, BLM or other land managers about fire restrictions before going hunting; restrictions can change suddenly.

Help solve Glendale elk poaching case

Since October, several bull elk in the Glendale area have been found dead, their meat wasted. The reward in the elk poaching cases has now reached $17,000, with state and local OHA chapters, local landowners and businesses, and the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde contributing. If you have information, contact OSP at (541) 440-3403 or call the TIP hotline at 1-800-452-7888.

DOUGLAS COUNTY

Western Oregon General Rifle season opens up on Saturday October 4th. Deer populations are similar to last year. Hunters are reminded to obtain permission before hunting on private lands. Hunters should find deer on the northerly slopes and near water and green up areas. Check local fire restrictions due to fire danger before hunting. The Rattle Fire 50 miles east of Roseburg continues so check with the USFS for up to date information on road closures and other restrictions when planning on hunting near that area.

NOTE: Biologists and OSP enforcement personnel will be out opening weekend patrolling, making contacts with hunters and asking for lymph node samples from the head of harvested bucks. Lymph node samples allow ODFW to test for disease.

Bear - General bear season is now open. Hunters can expect an average year. Hunters should concentrate their efforts in the berry patches in early morning and late afternoon. Bear numbers are good with the highest numbers in the coast range. Successful bear hunters are reminded there is a mandatory check-in for all harvested bear within 10 days of harvest (see regulations for details).

Cougar - Cougar season is open. Hunters can expect an average year. Cougars are abundant and wildly distributed. Hunting success is best around high deer population areas using a predator call.

Western Gray Squirrel - Gray squirrel season is currently open. Hunters can expect an average year. Squirrels are widely distributed throughout the county with good numbers in areas of oaks and conifers. Many areas of high squirrel populations are on private lands so hunters are reminded to ask for permission on these lands before hunting.

UPLAND GAMEBIRDS:

Grouse & Quail - The season is currently open. Hunters can expect a good year. Hunting availability and success for forest grouse should be also be good. Blue grouse success is best in mid to high elevations of the Cascades in partly open conifer stands. Ruffed grouse can be found near creeks mostly at mid elevations of both the Cascades and Coast Range. Hunters that kill grouse are asked to drop off in a paper bag the frozen wing and tail of each grouse at the local ODFW office. Please use 1 bird per bag with each frozen bag of grouse parts including the species, sex, age, unit and general area of harvest for proper analysis.

Nesting season was slightly below average for California quail and Mountain quail but hunting opportunity should be good. Success is best in the lower elevation agricultural lands for California quail and mid-elevations of the Cascades and Coast Range near brushy clear cuts on secondary forest roads for Mountain quail. Hunters are also asked if they kill a mountain quail to drop off in a paper bag the frozen wing and tail of each mountain quail at the local ODFW office. Please use 1 bird per bag with each frozen bag of quail parts including the species, sex, age, unit and general area of harvest for proper analysis.

MIGRATORY GAMEBIRDS:

Crow - Crow season opens up October 1. Hunters can expect an average year. Crow are abundant and widely distributed on the Umpqua Valley floor. Hunting crow is a challenge with most being on or adjacent to private lands.

COOS COUNTY

Warm weather will cause DEER to be less active in the mornings. However, this time of year occasional clod fronts will cycle through Coos County. This will result in increased deer activity. Hunters should concentrate their efforts on times when these fronts pass through. Most deer will be found in or near brushy forest openings like young clear-cuts. Hunters interested in hunting private forest lands should contact the owners of those lands to see if they are open to public access and what type of access in allowed. Recently, some of the local private forest land owners have changed their policy regarding motor vehicle access.

MTN QUAIL and CALIF QUAIL populations fared better than grouse due to the fact that their clutches hatch later in the spring, missing the winter-like weather. These birds will be found in brushy clear cuts and near agricultural areas.

FOREST GROUSE seasons are open and many forest grouse are harvested by deer hunters while they hunt deer. Grouse will be most abundant along closed forest roads where grass and brush is beginning to encroach on the road. Otherwise riparian areas are good places to hunt these birds. ODFW encourages grouse hunters to save one wing and the tail of grouse harvested. By turning these parts in to ODFW we can analyze them to gain imported information on the health of these populations. Paper bags with instructions on what parts to save are available from ODFW or from wing-deposit boxes at Dean Creek Elk Viewing Area or the Charleston ODFW office.

BEAR season is open. Populations in Coos County are healthy with the heaviest concentration of bears being in the northwest portion of the county. Himalayan blackberries have been ripe for some time now and due to the fact that huckleberries are becoming ripe in many places blackberries are beyond the point of being attractive to bears. As a result, bears will begin to disperse. Hunters should turn their attention to large patches of huckleberries or high elevation blackberries that are ripening more slowly. Predator calling may also be a good tactic for finding bears now that they are dispersing. Don't forget check-in is now mandatory for successful bear hunters.

COUGAR season is open. Cougars are abundant throughout with indicators pointing to stable or increasing numbers. Hunting cougar is a challenge because these animals are very secretive, but harvest success is greatest adjacent to private land with high deer populations using a predator call. Remember check-in is mandatory for successful hunters.

JACKSON, JOSEPHINE, CURRY COUNTIES

Archery season has closed. The season had many hot days and hunters struggled with noise, heat and in many areas for elk a late rut. Overall the season appeared to have a fair harvest.

DEER rifle season will begin Oct 4. For the last few years deer numbers have increased and it is expected that deer hunting will be similar to last year. Most deer will be in high elevations for the first half of the season with them beginning to migrate thru October. Opening weekend is expected to be cooler with possible rain for our area; this will quiet the forest and put deer on the move.

UPLAND GAME BIRDS season is open. Overall numbers appear to be lower than average with a few exceptions where pockets of birds have had good reproduction. Forest grouse can be found in timbered creek draws and mountain quail will be found in brushy clear cuts near water. A good bird dog will aid greatly in bird retrieval.

BEAR season is open. Hunters are continuing to have good success for this bear season. Bears have been found in early morning and late evening clear cuts and open grassy meadows. Some nice bears have been taken incidentally by hunters pursuing archery deer or calling for elk, so be sure and have your bear tag with you. Successful hunters, don't forget-you must bring bear skulls in thawed and with mouth propped open so biologists can collect and measure needed teeth and are able to tag skulls. Remember check-in is now mandatory. More information

General COUGAR season is open. Cougar populations continue to be plentiful. Predator calling has become one of the best methods for hunters. Locate major ridge lines and rocky out-cropping as areas of travel within cougar home range. Cougars have been harvested incidentally by hunters pursuing archery deer or calling for elk, so be sure and take your cougar tag with you. Hunters are reminded that they must brin.g their cougar into an ODFW office within 10 days to be checked and tagged, refer to regulations for details. Hunters are asked to bring in cougars thawed and mouths propped open for easier tissue sampling, teeth collection and tagging.

WESTERN GRAY SQUIRREL is now open throughout the west side of the state. Squirrel hunting is a great opportunity for young hunters to hone their hunting skills. Squirrels are found throughout Jackson, Josephine and Curry Counties with only a few hunters taking advantage of this hunting opportunity

SOUTHWEST ZONE VIEWING

Coos County

Shorebird migrations begin

Shorebirds are starting to migrate down the coast towards wintering grounds in Mexico and Central America and other points south. Large flocks of these birds will congregate in bays, on mud flats and along coastal beaches.

NEW: Waterfowl numbers will begin to increase on the south coast as the southward migration begins. Many of the earliest migrants include American widgeon, gadwall and green-winged teal. Viewers may also see cinnamon teal, blue-winged teal, Eurasian widgeon and others. Watch for these newcomers to our area around the edges of local and larger lakes.

Soon large groups of migratory geese will also become apparent. Many of these are Aleutian cackling Canada geese heading to the central valley of California.

Douglas County

Many species of birds are starting their southward migration so look for species congregating at roosts and feeders or in the air just before or during migration. Some migratory species to watch are: ospreys, turkey vultures, swifts, swallows, cedar waxwings, and some species of flycatchers, warblers, finches and shorebirds.

Vaux swifts swoop into Roseburg

Vaux swifts can be observed in downtown Roseburg and other areas gathering for their annual fall migration. Look for their aerial displays the last hour of daylight with congregating swifts flying in concentrations forming large vortex's before dropping into the top of their night roosting site.

Western Pond Turtles

Oregon's native Western pond turtles can be seen basking in the late summer sun in local ponds (Stewart Park) and reservoirs such as Cooper Creek, Galesville, Berry Creek and Plat I.

Jackson, Josephine County

Denman Wildlife Area

Denman Wildlife Area has had an increase of hawks, accipiters and buteos. Many Northern Harriers, Red-tailed hawks, and Rough-legged hawks have been seen hunting throughout the valley. Hunting season is occurring on the wildlife area so be aware of hunters while watching wildlife on the area. For information on the Wildlife Area, visit ODFW's Web site.

Many flocks of Greater White-fronted geese have been spotted in the valley flying high heading towards Klamath Falls. Because they fly so high, it is easier to recognize them by their unique call.

To hear their call, visit Whatbird.com.

CENTRAL ZONE<</p>

FISHING

Weekend Fishing Opportunities

" Steelhead fishing has been good on the Deschutes River between the mouth and Sherars Falls. Expect good numbers of steelhead between Sherars Falls and the Locked Gate the next couple of weeks.

" Anglers should expect peak numbers of Hood River summer steelhead in late September.

ANTELOPE RESERVOIR: rainbow trout

Reservoir stocked with 2500 catchable rainbow trout. However, an illegally introduced population of bullhead catfish has overpopulated leading to a reduced trout fishing opportunity.

BIG LAVA LAKE: rainbow trout

The bite at Big Lava is fair with some nice rainbow trout being caught.

CLEAR LAKE: rainbow trout

Clear Lake was recently stocked, and should provide excellent fishing opportunity.

CRANE PRAIRIE RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, brook trout, kokanee, largemouth bass

Fishing over the weekend was reported to be good. Fishing for rainbow trout continues to improve as the lower water levels move the fish into the channels. Some reports of nice fish being caught.

CRESCENT LAKE: brown trout, kokanee, rainbow trout

No report.

CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: redband trout and mountain whitefish

Anglers reported success throughout the summer and the trend seems to be continuing with cooler temperatures. Bait anglers are encouraged to get their fishing in as bait is only allowed until October 31, and will not resume until spring 2009. ODFW and OSU have initiated a radio telemetry study on redband trout and whitefish, and anglers are reminded that radio-tagged fish cannot be legally harvested. To determine if a fish is radio-tagged, anglers should check for an eight-inch wire antenna protruding from the rear of both redband and mountain whitefish. A sample of redband trout and mountain whitefish are also tagged with a numbered floy tag protruding from the back. Anglers who later catch a trout or whitefish with a floy tag are encouraged to release the fish after recording the tag number, fish length and location caught. Anglers can send the information to ODFW at (541) 447-5111 ext. 24 or michael.r.harrington@state.or.us.

CULTUS LAKE: lake trout, rainbow trout

No recent reports.

DAVIS LAKE: redband trout, largemouth bass

No recent reports. Please note Davis Lake is restricted to fly angling only.

DESCHUTES RIVER:

ODFW adopted temporary rules to allow sport anglers to fish for fall chinook in the Deschutes River beginning August 1. The following rules apply to these fisheries:

Deschutes River: The Deschutes River from the mouth at the I-84 bridge upstream to Sherars Falls is open to angling for trout, steelhead, chinook salmon from August 1, 2008 to October 31, 2008. The catch limit for chinook salmon is any two adults, and five jacks per day. Anglers may use bait from Sherars Falls downstream to the upper railroad trestle. Catch limits and restrictions applying to trout, steelhead, and coho remain unchanged from those listed in the 2008 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations for Area 1 of the Deschutes River.

Mouth: Anglers fishing the Columbia River at the mouth of the Deschutes River can expect good numbers of steelhead and Chinook. Anglers are reporting good catch of steelhead and Chinook.

Mouth to Warm Springs: steelhead, trout, fall chinook

Steelhead angling has been good on the Deschutes between Sherars Falls and the mouth. Good numbers of fish have been entering the river, this trend should continue into early October. Angling for steelhead above Sherars Falls should be improving dramatically as October approaches.

Anglers are encouraged to check the Sherars Falls Salmon and Steelhead Trap counts.

Trout fishing has been very good, especially with the advent of cooler weather. With cooler temperatures the fish have moved back into slower waters such as back eddies or the lower ends of riffles. Caddis hatches have been prolific, especially near dusk.

Lake Billy Chinook to Benham Falls: rainbow trout, brown trout

Angling in this reach is reportedly good for both rainbow trout and brown trout.

Benham Falls to Wickiup Reservoir: rainbow trout, brown trout

Some reports of a few nice brown trout being caught. No recent reports.

EAST LAKE: rainbow trout, brown trout, kokanee, Atlantic salmon

East Lake anglers are reporting fair catches of brown trout. Rainbow trout, Atlantic salmon and kokanee are also being caught. Kokanee are starting to turn color with some bright fish still out their being caught up to 15 inches in length.

ELK LAKE: Brook trout, kokanee

No recent reports.

FALL RIVER: rainbow trout

No recent reports.

FROG LAKE:

Due to accessibility issue hatchery fish that were allocated to be stocked in Frog Lake were stocked in nearby Clear Lake.

HAYSTACK RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, brown trout

Anglers reporting success fishing for trout, kokanee and bullhead catfish. Large mouth bass of 3-5 lb. are also present in the reservoir.

HOOD RIVER: summer steelhead, winter steelhead

The Hood River has been clearing due to glacial freezing on Mt. Hood. Catch rates should improve as the river clears. Anglers should expect peak numbers of Hood River summer steelhead in late September. Anglers are also reminded that retention of coho and chinook is prohibited in the Hood River.

Find out how many fish are being captured at the Powerdale Dam trap.

HOSMER LAKE: Atlantic salmon, brook trout

Some good reports of anglers catching Atlantics in the 10 to 11-inch range. Hosmer is a fly angling only lake providing a unique opportunity for Atlantic salmon. Hosmer also provides good opportunity for brook trout in the 14 to 17-inch range.

KINGSLEY RESERVOIR: rainbow trout

Kingsley was recently stocked, and should provide excellent fishing opportunity. Adult excess hatchery steelhead from Hood River have recently been stocked.

LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: bull trout, brown trout, rainbow trout, kokanee, smallmouth bass

Reports of good kokanee action. Kokanee are in good condition and up to 15 inches in length.

LAURANCE LAKE: rainbow trout

Laurance has been stocked twice and should provide good opportunity for rainbow and cutthroat trout. Anglers are reminded that only fin-clipped trout may be kept, and only artificial flies and lures may be used.

LITTLE LAVA LAKE: rainbow trout, brook trout

Fly anglers are reporting fair numbers of rainbow trout being caught.

LOST LAKE: rainbow trout

Lost Lake was recently stocked and should provide anglers good opportunity.

METOLIUS RIVER: redband trout, bull trout

No recent reports.

NORTH TWIN LAKE: rainbow trout

There is good opportunity for 8 to 12-inch rainbow with the potential for larger fish up to 18 inches as the water temperature starts to drop.

OCHOCO RESERVOIR: rainbow trout

Reports of good angling for rainbow trout.

ODELL LAKE: kokanee, lake trout, rainbow trout

Anglers are reporting good success for kokanee, with some anglers taking home limits of 12-inch fish. The lake trout fishing will start picking up as the kokanee are starting to stage at the mouths of the creeks. Please note that all bull trout need to be released unharmed. Anglers are encouraged to take time to learn how to differentiate between lake trout and bull trout.

PAULINA LAKE: brown trout, rainbow trout, kokanee

Anglers are reporting the fishing is picking up for kokanee as they are starting to stage for their spawn. The bite for the most part is early morning or the last hour before sunset.

PINE HOLLOW RESERVOIR: rainbow trout

No recent reports, but water levels are good and lots of fish should be available. Earlier in the year the reservoir received additional allocations of hatchery fish originally destined for (inaccessible) high elevation lakes.

PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR: rainbow trout, black crappie, bass

Anglers are reporting fair success for rainbow trout, and black crappie anglers are reporting consistent success. Bass angling has picked up.

ROCK CREEK RESERVOIR: rainbow trout

Angler reports have indicated excellent catches on recently stocked fish with many large brood trout. Lake levels may be low due to irrigation withdrawals.

SIMTUSTUS LAKE: rainbow trout, bull trout

No reports from the past weekend. Legal-sized rainbow trout were stocked before opening weekend and will continue to be stocked throughout the summer. A tribal angling permit is required in addition to a state angling license to fish in the lake. The bag limit is five trout per day including kokanee. Some bull trout are available. Bull trout limit is one fish with a 24-inch minimum as in Lake Billy chinook.

SOUTH TWIN LAKE: rainbow trout

Anglers have reported fair catches of rainbow trout in the 10 to 12-inch range. Some anglers are picking up brown bullheads that have bean illegally stocked in this lake. South Twin's nice shoreline makes the lake a good place to take young kids to fish.

SUTTLE LAKE: kokanee, brown trout

No recent reports.

TAYLOR LAKE: rainbow trout

No recent reports. Summertime temperatures are likely limiting success on rainbow trout but largemouth bass and bluegill should be readily available and aggressive.

Taylor Lake is also a good location to catch carp on the fly.

WALTON LAKE: rainbow trout

Stocked with 600 rainbows at 1.5 trout/lb and 1000 at 3 trout/lb in late August. Trout anglers have been reporting success.

WICKIUP RESERVOIR: kokanee, brown trout, rainbow trout, largemouth bass

There are reports of fly anglers having success for kokanee on the Deschutes arm. Some anglers are starting to pick up kokanee in the 16 to 18-inch range with jigs in the Deschutes arm below the buoy. Please note that the angling regulation for the Deschutes River arm upstream of the channel buoy located in the proximity of the West South Twin boat ramp is for flies and lures only through the remainder of the season.

Spawning kokanee at Sheep's Bridge on the Deschutes arm of Wickiup Reservoir provide a great fish viewing opportunity for the next several weeks. American bald eagle and osprey are also present to take advantage of the abundant spawning kokanee.

Anglers should also be aware that they will be unable to access the boat launch at Wickiup Reservoir Gullpoint Campground and the North Wickiup Boat Launch from Sept. 2 to Nov. 30. Construction crews will begin reconstruction of both ramps at the popular Deschutes National Forest recreation sites beginning Sept. 2. Boaters can use Wickiup Butte Boat Launch just southeast of Wickiup Dam on Forest Road 4260 or West South Twin Boat launch, located in West South Twin Campground across from South Twin Lake.

CENTRAL ZONE HUNTING

OPEN: Controlled deer hunting, forest grouse, crow (opens Oct. 1), mountain quail (Hood River and Wasco counties), bear, cougar

Visit the Region's Fall Hunting Forecast

Remember to check with Ore. Dept. of Forestry, the Forest Service, BLM or other land managers about fire restrictions before going hunting; restrictions can change suddenly.

DESCHUTES DISTRICT

The Wizard Fire may affect access to the Metolius Unit this weekend. On Tuesday morning, the north end of Road 1140 was closed on top of Green Ridge. See the Forest Service web site for latest information.

PRINEVILLE/OCHOCO WILDLIFE DISTRICT

Warm and dry conditions have been making hunting challenging. Temperatures at night have routinely been below freezing, and cooler and possibly wet weather is predicted for the weekend. Hunters should be equipped and prepared for unpredictable fall conditions. The Rager and South Boundary Travel Management Area's (TMA) on the Ochoco National Forest, Ochoco unit, will both be in effect starting Wednesday, Oct. 1. Maps are available at portal signs as you enter the TMA, or from local ODFW and forest service offices.

BUCK hunters should find above average opportunities in the Maury and Ochoco units where public lands provide ample access. Grizzly unit hunters will find hunting more challenging unless they have access to private lands. Buck numbers are slightly below last year's bumper season, but there appear to be more mature bucks for those hunters patient and skilled enough to find them. ODFW staff will be operating a disease sampling check station at the ODOT weigh station on Hwy. 26 at the east edge of Prineville Oct. 5-6 where hunters are invited to bring in animals for sampling.

BEAR are most numerous at higher elevation forested areas on the Ochoco National Forest in the Ochoco and Grizzly units. Hunters are reminded they will need a controlled buck tag for the area they are in to hunt during deer season. Remember check-in is mandatory statewide this year for successful hunters.

COUGARS are present at all elevations in the Maury, Ochoco, and Grizzly units. As with bear, cougar hunters need a controlled buck tag for the area they are hunting in if hunting during deer season. Remember cougars must be checked in at an ODFW office within 10 days after harvest.

ANTLERLESS ELK: Early antlerless elk hunts are ongoing in portions of the Maury, Ochoco, and Grizzly units. These hunts involve private lands along with some intermixed BLM lands. The largest concentrations of elk are on private lands where permission from the landowner is needed to hunt.

UPLAND GAME BIRDS: Best opportunities for blue and ruffed grouse will be at higher elevations, on more timbered north slopes across the Paulina and Lookout Mountain Ranger Districts of the Ochoco National Forest.

THE DALLES WILDLIFE DISTRICT

The eastern Oregon deer season opens this weekend. All units within the Mid-Columbia district should provide good opportunities for buck hunting this year.

Tag holders in the WHITE RIVER unit should focus their efforts within the higher elevation portions of the unit, as warm and dry conditions still persist. Deer will generally be in forested areas close to wate, and areas with green forage still available.

For hunters in the HOOD unit, be aware that the Gnarl Ridge fire has some roads and areas closed in conjunction with the fire suppression efforts. For the latest fire closure information call the Hood River Ranger District at 541-352-6002. Outside of the fire area, deer should be found in and around recent clear cut areas. Be sure to get permission to hunt on private timberland within the county.

Hunters in the WEST BIGGS and MAUPIN units need to be aware of private lands. All hunters should ask permission before entering private land. Hunters should also be aware that there were several large fires in the Deschutes and John Day canyons this summer.

For hunters wishing to pursue COUGAR, the best opportunity will be within the Deschutes or John Day canyons, where hunters can glass open hillsides and utilize predator calls to locate these elusive animals. Successful cougar hunters, remember check-in is mandatory; see the regulations for details.

Hunters in search of BEARS should focus their efforts in areas of available forage, whether high elevation berry fields or forested sections adjacent to orchard crops. Bears are generally active during the early morning or late evening periods. Predator calls can also be used, with a fawn bleat being one of the most effective calls. Successful bear hunters, remember check-in is mandatory statewide this year.

Those wishing to pursue COYOTE will find the best success near agricultural lands. Be sure to ask permission to hunt private lands.

FOREST GROUSE and MTN QUAIL seasons are open. Mt. quail and ruffed grouse can be found along stream bottoms within the national forest, especially in dense riparian areas. Blue grouse are easiest to locate on higher elevation ridge tops, with best success in open areas and berry patches.

CENTRAL ZONE VIEWING

EVENT

East Cascades Bird Conservancy Field Trip to Lower Bridge and Redmond Sewage Lagoons, Sat. Sept. 27

Birding trips are free of charge but we do encourage participants to join ECBC. Generally, these are day trips led by local birders who are enthusiastic and are keen to share their knowledge of the local birds and birding spots. We encourage people to carpool once people have arrived at the meeting place. Email Judy for more information jmeredit@bendnet.com

Bend Area

Wickiup Reservoir

Spawning kokanee at Sheep's Bridge on the Deschutes arm of Wickiup Reservoir provide a great fish viewing opportunity for the next several weeks. American bald eagle and osprey are also present to take advantage of the abundant spawning kokanee.

Information about Wickiup Reservoir.

Prineville Area

NOTE: Contact the Prineville BLM and Ochoco National forest for information on fire restrictions and closures.

Prineville Reservoir Wildlife Management Area

This is a good time to observe fledgling bald eagles, golden eagles, red-tail hawks and other young raptors as they sharpen their flying and hunting skills. Reduced water levels have decreased shoreline viewing and will make it difficult to use a canoe or kayak.

There are still great viewing opportunities for early morning or late afternoon hikers to observe a variety of big game, small mammals and birds by hiking the shoreline and upland areas. Motorized traffic within the management area is restricted to the north side access road and designated routes into dispersed camping sites.

Directions to the Prineville Reservoir Wildlife Management Area

White River Wildlife Area

Visitors to the area can see a wide variety of birds, including Lewis' Woodpeckers, Cooper's hawks and Pileated Woodpecker's.

The Dalles

Lower Deschutes Wildlife Area

Note: Due to two fires on the Lower Deschutes Wildlife Area over the summer the east bank of the river between River Mile 12 and RM 18 is burned off. The camping locations in that stretch are blackened.

Many different species frequent the Deschutes Canyon at this time of year with opportunities to view a wide variety of waterbirds, passerines, deer and bighorn sheep.

Bighorn sheep are a common site in the canyon. One of the most popular spots to view Bighorn rams is across the river from Jones campground, along the Mack's canyon access road. Springs along this stretch of river provide water and green forage for sheep during hot summer days.

Many different bird species are present in the Deschutes Wildlife Area, including osprey, kingfishers, great blue herons and Bullock's Orioles.

ODFW's Lower Deschutes Wildlife Area is located in The Dalles. Directions and more information about the Lower Deschutes Wildlife Area.

SOUTHEAST ZONE

FISHING

Weekend fishing opportunities

* Fishing on Fourmile Lake is very good for 12 to 21-inch lake trout .

* October can be a great month to target brown and rainbow trout on the lower Owyhee River.

* Dry fly fishing for brown trout on the Wood River can be very good this time of year on overcast days.

ANA RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout, hybrid bass

Ana Reservoir is open all year long for rainbow trout and hybrid bass angling. Fishing has been good for rainbow trout and hybrid bass. The use of live fish for bait is prohibited.

ANA RIVER: hatchery rainbow trout

Ana River is a great place to fish. Angling for rainbow trout has been good. The river level is high. Rainbow trout in this river can be very spooky so stealth is required. Bait angling is allowed and productive. Tui chub and pit roach are abundant in Ana River so large lures and flies mimicking minnows can be very successful.

ANTHONY LAKE: rainbow trout

Lake has been stocked with legal-sized trout. Fishing has been good.

BALM CREEK RESERVOIR: trout, bass

Trout fishing is fair. Bass are small.

BEULAH RESERVOIR: redband trout, hatchery rainbow trout, whitefish, bull trout

Inflow has varied from approximately 41 to 46 cfs from Sept. 22 through Sept. 29. The reservoir was 3 percent full on Sept. 28. Angling in the reservoir is poor for rainbow trout and slow for crappie.

BIG ROCK RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Last year the reservoir was reduced to a small pool by late summer. Freezing temperatures are suspected of having winter killed any hold over fish. Hatchery trout, fingerling size, were stocked in the reservoir this spring. Trout stocked as fingerlings will not be of harvestable size until next year.

BLITZEN RIVER: trout

Mainstem Blitzen and tributaries (except Little Blitzen) have a two fish trout bag limit from May 24 through Oct. 31. The Little Blitzen is a catch and release fishery year-round. Angling is fair to good for 10 to 16-inch redband trout. Flow was stable from Sept. 22 through Sept. 29, averaging near 34 cfs.

BULLY CREEK RESERVOIR: bass, white crappie, yellow perch, catfish, and trout.

Water level in the reservoir continues to drop. The reservoir was 9 percent full on Sept. 28. The boat ramp is not useable. Water level in the reservoir is expected to hit minimums in late September. Angling is slow.

BURNS POND: trout, bass

Angling should be slow to fair for rainbow trout.

CAMPBELL/DEADHORSE LAKES: hatchery rainbow trout

Access to these lakes was closed on July 28 by the USFS.

CHICKAHOMINY RESERVOIR: trout

Angling is fair to good for 12 to 19-inch rainbow trout. Angling should continue to improve as the water cools. Fly anglers have had some success with leech or mayfly imitations.

CHEWAUCAN RIVER: redband trout, largemouth bass

Angling has been very good for largemouth bass and brown bullhead in the lower river. Water temperatures have dropped significantly in the reservoir and river, aquatic vegetation on the shoreline makes angling challenging in some places. Angling is good for redband trout above Paisley. River levels are low, water clarity is good, and hatches have been prolific on the upper river in the early evening.

CHRISTMAS VALLEY GOLF COURSE POND: hatchery rainbow trout

Fish are still available at Christmas Valley Pond. Target trout by boat in the deep portions of the lake at the South end. Ask permission for access to the lake at the Christmas Valley Parks and Recreation office located next to the golf course lodge.

COTTONWOOD MEADOWS: rainbow trout, brook trout

Angling is good for rainbow trout, but slow for brook trout. Aquatic vegetation makes fishing difficult from the South and West side of the lake.

COTTONWOOD RESERVOIR: native redband trout

Fishing for native redband has been slow, but large trout are frequently caught in this reservoir. Late evening hatches have been observed on the reservoir recently. This is a great time to target actively feeding redband trout.

CRUMP LAKE: black crappie, native redband trout, yellow perch, brown bullhead

Crappie fishing has been slow. Access is limited by private ownership. One primitive boat ramp is available on the west side of the lake from the Plush-Adel Road. Crump Lake went dry last summer. Few fish are expected to be caught in the lake during the 2008 fishing season. Boating can be hazardous.

DELINTMENT LAKE: trout

Fair angling for rainbow trout. Extensive aquatic vegetation makes angling somewhat challenging.

DOG LAKE: largemouth bass, yellow perch, black crappie, brown bullhead

Dog Lake is closed to the retention of native, redband trout. This lake is not stocked with hatchery trout. Trophy bass fishing opportunities are available here. Recent sampling by ODFW found good numbers of 8-inch yellow perch and nice-sized bluegill in the lake. Bass were not numerous, but some fish over 3 pounds were observed. Four to six-inch bass were stocked in the lake last week. These fish will be available for future angling opportunities in 2009 and 2010.

DREWS RESERVIOR: native redband trout, largemouth bass, channel catfish, brown bullhead, yellow perch, black crappie

Reservoir levels are dropping and launching a large boat can be challenging at the boat ramp. Catch rates have been good for both bass and crappie. Boat with care; watch for fences and rock jacks submerged in the reservoir near the shoreline.

DUNCAN RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Decreasing water temperatures have produced improved catch rates at the reservoir. Bait angling can be good along the shoreline.

FISH LAKE (Baker County): rainbow trout, brook trout

Lake has been stocked with legal rainbow trout, and has been very good for rainbow and brook trout.

FISH LAKE (Steens Mountain): brook trout, rainbow trout

Angling has been fair to good for both rainbow and brook trout. Between 200 and 500 rainbow and brook trout died the week of September 15, and the cause was not determined. However, numerous fish were observed feeding when staff investigated the incident.

FOURMILE LAKE: rainbow trout, lake trout, kokanee, brook trout

Angling is very good for lake trout in the 12-21 inch range in about 30 feet of water. Lake trout and brook trout are beginning to move into the shallows for spawning. Large kokanee up to 16 inches are available, but overall angling for kokanee has been slow. Best angling is early morning and late evening as the afternoon wind makes angling difficult. The best angling is from a boat along the rocky northern shoreline. Rainbow trout and brook trout are available near shore in shallower water in the late evenings and mornings.

GERBER RESERVOIR: crappie, yellow perch, brown bullhead and largemouth bass

Angling has been fair for crappie. Angling has been good for yellow perch. Bullhead can be caught off the bank from the campground areas. Largemouth bass are also available.

GRANDE RONDE LAKE: rainbow and brook trout

Lake has been stocked with legal rainbow trout. Fishing is good for rainbow and brook trout.

HART LAKE: black crappie, native redband trout, yellow perch, brown bullhead

Crappie angling has slowed. The lake is very shallow, and high winds can make boating hazardous.

HEART LAKE: hatchery rainbow trout and kokanee

Angling is very good for rainbow trout and fair for kokanee. It is difficult to fish from the shore because of the aquatic vegetation around the lake. Fisherman have been casting out from the shoreline beyond the weed line, and using bait on the bottom to attract both rainbow trout and kokanee.

HIGGINS RESERVOIR: trout

Fishing has been good. Access is walk in only. Has not been stocked for two years due to access issues.

HOLBROOK RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Angling is slow for stocked rainbow trout. Fish die offs have occurred. The reservoir is down about 10 feet, and will continue to decline from water-righted, irrigation outtake. Launching a large boat would be very difficult at the boat ramp. Fish will be concentrated in the deeper sections of the lake.

HWY 203 POND: trout, bass, bluegill

Has been stocked several times with legal-sized rainbow trout. Fishing is fair. Fish in the morning or evening for best results.

JUNIPER LAKE: cutthroat trout

The lake is nearly dry.

KRUMBO RESERVOIR: trout and largemouth bass

Angling is fair to good for 16 to 19-inch rainbow trout and fair to good for 12 to 16-inch largemouth bass. A variety of gear has been effective. There is good bank access near the boat ramp and on the southwest shoreline. There is also an accessible fishing platform near the boat ramp. Extensive aquatic vegetation may make angling challenging. An angler reported a recent blue-green algae bloom.

KLAMATH AND AGENCY LAKES: redband trout

Angling for redband trout has been fair. Anglers are catching yellow perch in Recreation Creek near the Rocky Point lodge. Redband trout are beginning to move back into the lakes as water quality improves.

KLAMATH RIVER: native rainbow- redband trout

The Klamath River below Keno dam opens on Oct. 1. Anglers should be aware that PacifiCorp has closed the Old Wagon Road off Clover Creek road which provided access to anglers immediately below Keno dam. Anglers can still access this area by walking or biking. Angling should be good for large rainbow trout. The Klamath River from JC Boyle Dam to the JC Boyle Powerhouse is consistently good for catching redband trout. Most redband trout in this section range from 6-12 inches. The Klamath River below the Powerhouse is fair for redband trout 10-14 inches. Angling in the early morning or late evening is best due to a drop in flows.

LAKE OF THE WOODS: hatchery rainbow trout, kokanee, hatchery brown trout, yellow perch, brown bullhead, largemouth bass, crappie, and smallmouth bass

Angling for hatchery rainbow and kokanee has been excellent. The lake was stocked with trophy rainbow trout for Labor Day weekend. Angling for brown trout has been fair but is improving as brown trout prepare for spawning. Most successful angling is from a boat for rainbow trout, brown trout and kokanee. Angling can be successful for yellow perch and brown bullhead from the shore. Yellow perch are the most common fish species in the lake.

LOFTON RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Angling from the shore has become difficult with the numerous tui chub and aquatic vegetation growing on the north and east shorelines. Fishing from the dam, dock, and south side of the lake allows the angler to access deeper water.

LOST RIVER: brown bullhead, yellow perch, largemouth bass, Sacramento perch, pumpkinseed sunfish, bluegill

Angling is slow for warmwater fish. Poor water quality at this time is limiting angling opportunities.

LUCKY RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Lucky Reservoir has good populations of trout but catch rates are low due to the turbid water. Little aquatic vegetation and algae growth are observed in this reservoir, it is a great place to try in late summer when other reservoirs are more difficult to fish.

MALHEUR RIVER (Warm Springs Reservoir downstream to South Fork Malheur River): redband trout and hatchery rainbow trout

On Sept. 28, Warm Springs reservoir was at 1 percent of full pool and discharge below Warm Springs Dam has been shut off for the winter. Flow in the river is limited to seepage from Warm Springs Reservoir. Angling for trout is slow.

MALHEUR RIVER (from the South Fork Malheur River near Riverside, downstream to Gold Creek): redband trout and hatchery rainbow trout

Discharge from Warm Springs Reservoir has been shut off for the winter, but 75 cfs was being released from Beulah Reservoir Sept. 29. Angling for trout is slow.

MALHEUR RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

The water level is well below the end of the ramp. Launching larger boats will be difficult. With the cooler conditions angling has picked up. Good numbers of trout are being caught from the bank.

MALHEUR RIVER, NORTH FORK: redband trout, whitefish, and bull trout

Angling should be fair with recent cool weather. Remember to release bull trout.

MALHEUR RIVER, MIDDLE FORK: redband trout, brook trout, and bull trout

Angling should be fair with recent cool weather. Remember to release bull trout.

MANN LAKE: trout

Slow angling for cutthroat trout. The lake is very low, and illegally introduced goldfish have disrupted the trout fishery.

MILLER LAKE: brown trout, kokanee, rainbow trout

The Lake has been producing good catches of brown trout. The Lake is open to angling 24 hours/day, with successful brown trout anglers targeting the early morning and late evening hours. Most kokanee in the lake are less than eight inches and are not abundant.

MOON RESERVOIR: bass, trout

The water level is very low. Slow angling for bass. No angling report for trout.

MUD LAKE: hatchery rainbow trout

The lake level has dropped significantly below half full level. Catch rates have been low, but large fish are common in this lake. The lake is turbid year-round.

MURRAY RESERVOIR: trout

Fishing is fair. Some moss is showing up along the bank.

NORTH MALHEUR BLM STOCK PONDS: rainbow trout

All of the BLM ponds in the Harper-Westfall area were stocked on May 30 with fingerling-sized rainbow trout. Littlefield and Squaw Creek reservoirs have good carryover populations. Angling is improving with the cooler weather conditions.

OVERTON RESERVOIR:

Overton Reservoir is slow for rainbow trout. Most of the reservoir surface is covered in aquatic vegetation. Your best bet is to fish in the morning or late afternoon targeting areas where the wind has cleared of surface vegetation.

OWYHEE RESERVOIR: largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, black crappie, yellow perch, catfish

The reservoir was 23 percent full on Sept. 28. The boat ramps at McCormick State Park Leslie Gulch are out of the water. No recent angling report.

OWYHEE RIVER (Lower): brown trout and hatchery rainbow trout

Angling for rainbow trout and brown trout remains good. Catches of brown trout from 12 to 20 inches are common. Rainbow trout are less abundant, but anglers have been catching some larger fish. Flows averaged 1752 cfs Sept. 28.

OWYHEE RIVER (Upper): smallmouth bass and channel catfish

Discharge at the Rome gauge varied from approximately 102 to 110 cfs from Sept. 24 through Sept. 29. Angling for smallmouth and channel catfish should be good.

PAIUTE RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout and hatchery Lahontan cutthroat trout

Angling is slow due to turbid conditions and extremely low water levels.

PHILLIPS RESERVOIR: trout, perch

Some trout are being caught but they are generally skinny. Perch angling has slowed but is still fair. Some 8-10 inch bass were caught earlier, but no recent report. Water level is 46 percent.

PILCHER RESERVOIR: trout

Reports of catching some 10 to 12-inch trout. Crappie fishing is slow-fair using jigs with crappie nibbles or cut-bait. Some crappie are large. Reservoir is 40 percent full. Reservoir was stocked with additional legal trout in July.

PINE CREEK (Baker County): trout

Pine Creek and North Pine Creek were stocked twice with legal-sized rainbow trout. Fishing is good near Cornucopia.

POLE CREEK RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Water level in the reservoir is very low. The reservoir may be at minimum pool. Angling is poor.

POWDER RIVER: trout, spring chinook

Rainbow trout fishing is fair-good below Mason Dam.

SID LUCE: hatchery rainbow trout

Fishing for trout in this reservoir has been good. Fishing in the morning is the best; as the wind can make fishing and boating challenging by late morning or early afternoon. The road into Sid Luce has eroded considerably. Four wheel drive vehicles are recommended.

SOUTH MALHEUR BLM STOCK PONDS: hatchery rainbow trout

All of the ponds in the Jordan Valley area were stocked with fingerling trout on June 3. Several reservoirs north of Jordan Valley have carryover populations. Angling has improved with the cooler weather conditions.

SPAULDING RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Spaulding Reservoir is dry. ODFW will not stock the reservoir with fingerlings due to continued problems with water retention at the reservoir.

SPRAGUE RIVER: redband trout, brown trout, brown bullhead, largemouth bass, yellow perch

Angling has been fair for redband trout. Angling should be good for bass and brown bullhead below the town of Beatty. Angling is good for redband trout and large brown trout below Sandhill Crossing to the 3411 road crossing. Angling for large brown trout and redband trout is fair in the South Fork. Angling is good for small brook trout and small brown trout near Camp and Corral Creek on the South Fork Sprague.

SUNSTONE RESERVOIR: hatchery rainbow trout

Sunstone reservoir went dry last summer, but it filled to full capacity this spring. The reservoir is down a couple of feet, fish are very active, and 8-10' fish are being caught near the dam face.

SYCAN RIVER: redband trout, brown trout, brook trout

Angling is slow for redband trout below the Sycan Marsh. Flows are very low and the water is warm. The upper Sycan is fair for redband trout and brook trout. Below Pikes crossing most fish caught are redband trout and as you progress upstream of Pikes crossing most fish are brook trout. Look for concentrations of brook trout as they prepare for spawning.

THIEF VALLEY RESERVOIR: trout

Fishing is slow. Reservoir is 5 percent full. The reservoir will be stocked with large fingerlings this fall when the water levels come up.

THOMPSON RESERVOIR: largemouth bass, hatchery rainbow trout

Angling has been slow for rainbow trout and largemouth bass. Recent sampling by ODFW found bass in the 4 to 5 pound range and numerous rainbow trout in the reservoir. Water levels are declining. Bass will be concentrated on the south shore and at the face of the dam.

TOPSY RESERVOIR: largemouth bass, brown bullhead, crappie, yellow perch, bluegill, Sacramento perch, pumpkinseed sunfish, redband trout

Angling for crappie is fair. Most crappie are 8-10 inches.

TWIN LAKES (Baker County): rainbow trout

The lake has been stocked with 1,700 legal-sized rainbow trout and was re-stocked with 1,000 additional half-pound trout in August.

UPPER MIDWAY RESERVOIR: largemouth bass

Angling is difficult due to abundant aquatic vegetation. Most bass caught are 8-10 inches.

UNITY RESERVOIR: trout, bass, crappie

Trout fishing is fair. Crappie fishing is very slow. Reservoir is 20 percent full. There is a lot of algae on the lake.

VEE LAKE:

Angling is slow in Vee Lake. The reservoir is very low and water temperatures are rising quickly. A breech in the canal delivering water to the Lake was found and fixed by the USFS in July. Improved water conditions are expected, but water levels will not significantly increase until next year.

WARM SPRINGS RESERVOIR: smallmouth bass, white crappie, catfish, perch, and hatchery rainbow trout

The reservoir was 1 percent full Sept. 28. Inflows ranged from 15cfs to 80cfs from Sept. 24 through Sept. 29. Fishing is slow.

WARNER LAKES: black crappie, brown bullhead, yellow perch

Fishing for crappie and perch has been slow. Most of the small lake are dry. The northern lakes are low and shallow; boating access can be difficult.

WILLIAMSON RIVER (UPPER): redband trout and brook trout

Angling is fair for redband trout and brook trout. Grasshopper patterns can be effective cast to undercut banks. Mahogany mayfly duns are hatching in the afternoon.

WILLIAMSON RIVER (LOWER):

Angling is slow. Redband trout are in the Williamson River in good numbers. Hatches of small mayflies are getting fish interested. Trolling lures below Modoc Point bridge can be effective.

Angling for largemouth bass has been fair. Small bluegill are abundant. A few nice crappie have been caught but crappie were not abundant in last year's electrofishing surveys.

WITHERS LAKE: brown trout, brook trout

Brook trout fishing has been good for trout in the 8 to 12-inch range. Large brown trout tend to be found in the deep water on the north side of the lake. Fishing is good in the morning and mid-afternoon. Aquatic vegetation on the south side of the lake has made brook trout fishing more challenging.

WOLF CREEK RESERVOIR: crappie, trout

Fishing is fair-poor for 11 to 14-inch trout, and they are skinny. Some crappie are biting around the dock. Reservoir is 35 percent full.

WOOD RIVER AND TRIBUTARIES: redband trout, brown trout, brook trout, yellow perch

Angling is fair for brown trout and redband trout. Angling for redband trout is improving as more fish move into the Wood River to stage for spawning. Frost in the morning is decreasing the grasshopper abundance. Small mahogany dun mayflies are emerging in the afternoon. Caddisfly activity is increasing in the evening. Dry fly fishing for brown trout can be very good this time of year on overcast days.

YELLOWJACKET LAKE: trout

Fair to good angling for 10 to 13-inch rainbow trout. Extensive aquatic vegetation may make angling difficult. Fly anglers have had good success using leech and midge imitations. Bait anglers have had good success using PowerBait.

SOUTHEAST ZONE HUNTING

OPEN: Controlled deer hunting (many seasons open Oct. 4), forest grouse, bear, cougar, crow (opens Oct. 1)

Visit the Region's Fall Hunting Forecast

Remember to check with Ore. Dept. of Forestry, the Forest Service, BLM or other land managers about fire restrictions before going hunting; restrictions can change suddenly.

LAKE COUNTY

For DEER hunters, good numbers of mature bucks should be available in all units. Fawn recruitment was poor last year so there will be a lack of yearling bucks. Elk numbers are very low throughout the county.

FOREST GROUSE hunting are open. The best areas for blue and ruffed grouse are in the Cascades on Winema National Forest. Blue grouse can be found along ridge tops in more open forest habitats in both Klamath and Lake Counties while ruffed grouse are generally found along riparian areas, with few ruffed grouse found in Lake Co.

BEAR hunting is now open. Bear numbers are lower in Southeast zone than in other portions of the state due to limited habitat but populations are stable to increasing. Look in forested areas within the zone. Remember bear check-in is now mandatory.

COUGAR hunting is now open. Populations in Southeast Zone are healthy. Remember check-in is mandatory for successful hunters.

By this time of year COYOTE diets consist of small rodents and the young of big game animals. They respond well to calling during the summer months, and hunters should focus efforts in mule deer or antelope fawning areas or along riparian areas that have higher rodent numbers. Hunters should be aware that cougars will respond to predator calls.

KLAMATH COUNTY

DEER hunting is expected to be only fair this year due to poor fawn survival. Numbers of yearling bucks will be down, however fair numbers of older age-class bucks exist.

BEAR season continues and good opportunities exist. Hunters are reminded the tag sale deadline is October 3. Bears are being taken in the Keno, West Sprague, and West Fort Rock Units in the Cascade Mountains. Remember that check-in is now mandatory for successful hunters.

Fair prospects exist for FOREST GROUSE for those hunters wishing to pursue these birds. Best prospects for blue grouse are on semi-open ridge tops throughout the county, while ruffed grouse can be found along riparian areas primarily in the Cascades.

COUGAR season remains open with good populations, although hunting will be difficult until late fall when colder weather improves conditions to locate animals. Remember check-in is mandatory for successful hunters.

HARNEY COUNTY

For DEER hunters, good numbers of mature bucks should be available in all units. Fawn recruitment was poor last year so there will be a lack of yearling bucks.

BEAR hunting is now open. Bear numbers are lower in Southeast zone than in other portions of the state due to limited habitat but populations are stable to increasing. Look in forested areas within the zone. Remember bear check-in is now mandatory for successful hunters.

COUGAR hunting is now open. Populations in Southeast Zone are healthy. Remember check-in is mandatory for successful hunters.

By this time of year COYOTE diets consist of small rodents and the young of big game animals. They respond well to calling during the summer months, and hunters should focus efforts in mule deer or antelope fawning areas or along riparian areas that have higher rodent numbers. Hunters should be aware that cougars will respond to predator calls.

KLAMATH WILDLIFE AREA

Gorr Island, Shoalwater Bay and Sesti Tgawaals Point Units:

No permit required and open daily during authorized hunting seasons.

Miller Island Unit:

Hunting is by permit only. Entry permits shall be in possession while in the field; checkout is required. The check station is located under the area light on Miller Island Rd. The check station is staffed by ODFW personnel in the mornings from Oct. 11 - Dec. 14, and is a self-service station in the afternoons and all day after Dec. 14. The check station opens 1-1/2 hours before shooting time.

Hunting dates for Miller Island will be Oct. 11*, 12*, 14, 16, 18*, 19*, 21, 23, 25*, 27, 29, 31, even- numbered days in Nov. and Dec. and odd-numbered days in Jan. (*Reservation hunting is in effect. Oct. 25 is reserved for youth hunters in subunits A and B only. Subunit C is open to all hunters on a first come, first served basis).

To prevent hunter crowding, a reservation application procedure will be in effect for weekends through Oct. 19 and Oct. 25. Refill and standby hunters may be checked in after all reservation holders have checked in. All hunters must have in their possession a valid reservation permit to check into the area. Reservation holders must check in 1/2 hour before shooting time. Upland game bird shooting hours are from 8 a.m. until the close of waterfowl shooting hours.

Reminder: Successful applicants must purchase their reservation permit before arriving at the WA. Licensing documents are not available at the WA. No person shall use or possess any shot other than federally-approved nontoxic shot while in the Miller Island Unit.

Throughout the pheasant season a pheasant release program will occur. These birds have been donated by Unlimited Pheasants and will be released into subunits A, B and C.

" Subunit A: North of Miller Island Rd and east of Delameter Rd hunting is permitted until 1 p.m. through Dec. 14. From Oct. 11 - Dec. 14, hunter numbers will be limited to 35 at any one time.

" Subunit B: West of Delameter and Miller Island rds hunting is permitted until 1 p.m. through Dec. 14. From Oct. 11 - Dec. 14 hunter numbers will be limited to 35 at any one time.

" Subunit C: East and south of Miller Island Rd hunting is permitted all day. From Oct.11 - Dec. 14 hunter numbers will be limited to 35 until 1 p.m. After 1 p.m. hunting is allowed with a self-service permit available at a check station located on Miller Island Rd, West

Klamath Wildlife Area is closed to deer hunting.

Some wetland units in Subunit B are dry to facilitate habitat management activities to reduce encroaching bulrush and cattail and increase open water for waterfowl and shorebird use.

The gravel access road and boat ramp on Miller Island Unit of the Klamath Wildlife Area will be closed intermittently until Oct. 15 to allow for road work and boat ramp and dock improvements. Alternate facilities are available at Veteran's Park in Klamath Falls, or PPL Park near Keno. The closure could impact hunters during the opening weekend of waterfowl season (Oct. 11). Access will be allowed on weekends and occasionally after project work hours for recreationists to launch and retrieve boats.

SUMMER LAKE WILDLIFE AREA

General bow hunting season for deer on Summer Lake Wildlife Area closed over the past weekend. Controlled Buck Mule deer hunting will open on Saturday Oct. 4 for Wagontire and Silver Lake unit tag holders. Hunters are reminded that a new regulation is in effect this year that prohibits the use of centerfire rifle and handguns on the Wildlife Area. Shotguns with slugs or #1 buck or larger shot as well as muzzleloaders are legal hunting methods this year. Mule deer can be found throughout the Wildlife Area with Northend and other agricultural areas providing the best opportunities. Hunting pressure has been light and no harvest has been reported.

Hunters must check-in and have a free daily hunting permit in their possession.

Youth Waterfowl Hunting occured over the past weekend and was very successful. At total of 65 hunter days were recorded reported harvest was 237 ducks and 21 geese. Bird per hunter average was 4.10 well above last year and the previous 5 year average.

Please contact Summer Lake Wildlife Area at (541) 943-3152 or email martin.j.stlouis@state.or.us for additional information.

SOUTHEAST ZONE VIEWING

EVENT

Harney County

Fall shorebird migration is well underway and waterfowl migration activity should pick up within the next few weeks, however viewing opportunities are limited due to low water conditions. Many resident shorebirds, like ibis and avocets, have already moved out of the area. Sandhill cranes and Canada geese can be seen congregating on private farmlands within the Harney Basin especially were flood irrigation is occurring.

Look around green agricultural fields or wetlands in the early mornings and evenings to see deer and antelope while they are actively feeding during the cool part of the day.

Sightings near Hines include flocks of White-crowned Sparrow and American Goldfinch and the first of the Sandhill Crane flocks. It's also fun to watch for Oregon's state bird, the Western meadowlark.

Malheur National Wildlife Area

The Malheur National Wildlife Area and associated public and private lands provide an abundance wildlife viewing. The Center Patrol Road and headquarters area are excellent wildlife viewing areas on the Malheur Refuge.

What to see from August through October:

Over 200 pairs of greater sandhill cranes nest on the refuge each year. In September large groups of cranes begin congregating in the grainfields on the refuge. Cranes from northern latitudes join Malheur birds to feed before continuing their journey to California's Central Valley where they winter. Early morning and late evening are the best times to view these birds. Ask at the Visitors Center for grainfield locations.

Warblers, sparrows and other songbirds reach their autumn peak at Malheur from mid August through late September at Refuge Headquarters, P-Ranch and Page Springs. Joining the regular visitors are more unusual species, such as American redstart, indigo bunting and the possible eastern vagrant.

Many of the marshes and meadows dry up in the fall, driving concentrations of ibis, gulls, terns, pelicans and herons to cluster around the remaining pools of open water to feed on trapped fish. Ducks concentrate in open water areas at the display pond at headquarters and Benson and Knox ponds north of the P-Ranch.

Malheur also hosts an array of raptors. Swainson's and Red-tailed hawks are present and bald eagles and rough-legged hawks begin arriving in mid October. Watch for raptors on power poles and in open fields and stay alert for the occasional merlin or peregrine falcon.

In addition to the abundance of birds using the refuge, mule deer are common. Refuge headquarters and the southern Blitzen Valley are a couple of their favorite spots. Pronghorn antelope are also in the area, and elk are occasionally observed.

Source: Malheur National Wildlife Area Web site.

Refuge Headquarters is located on the south side of Malheur Lake about 32 miles southeast of Burns. The refuge and museum are open daily from dawn until dusk. The Visitors Center is open Monday through Thursday from 8:00 to 4:00 and Friday through Sunday from 9:00 to 3:00.

Klamath Falls Area

Aspen Lake provides prime viewing for many species of wildlife including sandhill crane, great-blue heron, wood duck, gadwall, mallard, cinnamon teal. Early morning or late evening are good bets for elk and deer around the edge of the lake. Aspen Lake is located three miles south of Doak Mountain summit on Highway 140 west of Klamath Falls.

Moore Park is a great location to view many species of passerine birds including nuthatches, warblers, chickadees, flycatchers, swallows and sparrows. Several woodpecker species can also be observed including Lewis' woodpecker, red-shafted flicker and white-headed woodpecker.

Moore Park is located at the south end of Upper Klamath Lake off Lakeshore Drive in Klamath Falls, Oregon. This city park is adjacent to Putnam's Point Park which is across from the north end of the Link River Trail.

Upper Klamath Lake

Upper Klamath Lake, located just north of Klamath Falls, provides prime viewing for many aquatic birds. Many aquatic birds are including Western and Clark's grebes are well into the nesting season. Young grebes can be observed hitching rides on their parents backs near shoreline areas. Pied-billed and eared grebes can also be observed along lakeshore areas. White pelicans and double-crested cormorants can be found foraging on fish. Pelicans are colonial nesters and only nest in a few isolated areas which offer security from harassment.

Klamath Falls Wildlife Area

Some wetland units in Subunit B are dry to facilitate habitat management activities to reduce encroaching bulrush and cattail and increase open water for waterfowl and shorebird use.

The gravel access road and boat ramp on Miller Island Unit will be closed intermittently from the week of Sept. 2 until Oct. 15 to allow for road work and boat ramp and dock improvements. Alternate facilities are available at Veteran's Park in Klamath Falls, or PPL Park near Keno. The closure could impact water-skiers as well as hunters during the youth waterfowl season (Sept. 27-28) and the opening weekend of waterfowl season (Oct. 11).

Access will be allowed on weekends and occasionally after project work hours for recreationists to launch and retrieve boats. Please yield right-of-way to construction vehicles, and comply with all posted signs.

The improvement project was made possible through grants received from the Oregon State Marine Board (OSMB) and the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife (ODFW) Sport Fish Restoration Fund. The ODFW grant paid for 50 percent of the cost, and the Marine Board grant covered 50 percent. This project includes grading, widening and straightening of the gravel access road, replacing the boat dock and ramp, and development of a wheelchair accessible parking area and boarding dock. This will make the boat ramp and road safer for the public to use.

Dog training may occur on the entire area except for posted Safety Zones. Overnight camping is not allowed on the Miller Island Unit. If you have any questions, please contact Klamath Wildlife Area at (541) 883-5734.

Lake County and Lakeview Area

The fall shorebird migration has started. Lake Abert and the mudflats next to the Warner Valley lakes are the best places for viewing significant numbers including phalarope, avocet, stilts and various peeps. Sandhill cranes are still common in agricultural areas in the county.

Summer Lake Wildlife Area

This section was updated on September 29. Vehicle access to the Wildlife Viewing Loop is open again and will remain that way through Oct. 7, three days prior to the opening of general waterfowl hunting seasons. It will be closed through the remainder of the year and into 2009 until January 26, 2009.

Nearly all of the Area's wetlands are well flooded and receiving considerable waterbird use. Ducks, shorebirds, waders and passerine species are staging in good numbers. Fall migration is well underway and southward migrants are appearing in good numbers. Waterfowl hunting seasons will begin this weekend and viewing opportunities will be limited to areas open to hunting as well as the Schoolhouse Lake Viewing Blind.

Waterfowl

Fall migration is in full swing now. Ducks from outlying areas and northern breeding locales are beginning to congregate. Many species are beginning to group into large flocks as they prepare for migration. Nearly all cinnamon teal have departed for California, Mexico and other Central America wintering areas.

Resident Canada geese are dispersed widely across the Wildlife Area and adjacent private lands. Tule greater white-fronted geese reached a peak last week and will decline as fall progresses.

Shorebirds, waders and other waterbirds

Shorebird fall migration is nearly over, and most migrants have passed through the area. A few dowitchers (mostly long-billed), peeps (least and Western sandpipers) and phalaropes (Wilson's and red-necked) can still be found. This is a good time to find rare or unusual late migrants.

Sandhill cranes have mostly departed, only a few remain.

Other waterbird species are becoming scarce now with only a few lingering individuals still present.

Raptors and Others

Resident raptors remain scattered throughout the Wildlife Area as well as on private lands along Highway 31. Migrant and dispersing juvenile raptors are found in good numbers throughout the Summer Lake Basin and are very apparent along Highway 31. Meadows offer excellent foraging opportunities for many raptors. Northern harriers are especially numerous over marsh and hay meadows. Bald eagles are infrequently seen across the Wildlife Area now. Peregrine and prairie falcons, Cooper's and sharp-shinned hawks and golden eagles are sometimes seen during this time of the year. Great-horned owls chicks have fledged and difficult to discern from adults. A family group is easily observed at River Ranch Barn. Most osprey have migrated south and are difficult to find at this time.

Upland game birds

California quail are grouping into larger coveys now. Pheasant broods continue to be observed around agricultural and Northend areas, chicks are nearly full grown.

Eurasian collared doves remain at Headquarters Complex and resident mourning doves are scarce.

Passerine (perching) species, especially sparrows and finches remain fairly common around the Headquarters complex, Summer Lake Rest Area, homestead sites and shelter break plantings at the north end of the Area where they are attracted to tree and shrub cover.

Blackbirds continue to be found throughout the Area's emergent marsh areas, most starting to flock up as they prepare to migration south. Flocks of blackbirds are staging in agricultural areas and can be observed feeding on seed heads of small grains and grasses. Most swallows have migrated south but a few species can still be found around Headquarters and scattered across marsh areas.

Facilities and Access

Non-motorized access and viewing opportunities are available across most of the Area at this time. During waterfowl hunting seasons, access is restricted to areas open for hunting and to the Schoolhouse Lake Viewing Blind. Camping is permitted at four sites on the Wildlife Area. Users are urged to exercise care with campfires. Campgrounds are primitive but each have vault toilets, trash barrels and a few picnic tables.

The Wildlife Viewing Loop is now open until Oct. 9 when it closes through general waterfowl hunting season and into late January 2009.

Access to Schoolhouse Lake Viewing Blind will remain open to foot travel and will afford excellent opportunities for observation of staging waterbirds.

Viewers need to continue to use caution since road edges can still be soft and muddy, especially along the edges of canals and ponds. Secondary and minor dikes remain closed to motor vehicle traffic and cross country travel by motor vehicles and ATVs is prohibited.

Habitat

Many of the Wildlife Area's wetland habitats remain well flooded now, and large areas of shallowly flooded seasonal wetlands are available to waterbirds. Evapotranspiration rates remain high and many wetland areas are slow to respond to fall flooding. Irrigation season in Summer Lake Valley has ended, and significant increase in flows down Ana River and towards many wetland units on the Wildlife Area is occurring. Water levels are increasing in most seasonally flooded wetland units and will provide diverse foraging opportunities to migrant waterbirds. These wetlands are favored by a wide variety of migrants as and are very rich in natural food sources.

Wetland enhancement/construction activities have ended in the River Ranch unit and conditions in this 530 acre unit will remain dry through the end of fall. Link Marsh unit that was held dry last year is being flooded at this time and large numbers of waterfowl and other waterbirds can be found feeding in this area.

Warm day time temperatures continue and large numbers of flys, midges and other flying insects are found throughout the Area. Mosquitoes, deer flys and horse flys are numerous and provide another abundant food source to insectivorous birds. Please remember to use protective measures to avoid these biting insects.

Recently mowed meadows and hayfields found on adjacent private lands and in selected locations on the Wildlife Area were recently flooded and considerable vegetation regrowth has occurred.

Upland habitat remains in very good condition due to warm daytime temperatures that has resulted in excellent new growth of many species of forbs and grasses. Recently farmed food plots are providing foraging sites to many species looking for seeds and invertebrates in cultivated areas. Tree and shrub developments at the Middle Well and Turner Place have produced abundant fruit and considerable bird use is occurring at this time.

Please contact Summer Lake Wildlife Area at (541) 943-3152 or e-mail martin.j.stlouis@state.or.us for additional information.

NORTHEAST ZONE

FISHING

Weekend Fishing Opportunities

* Steelhead and salmon fishing on the Umatilla River should continue to improve as water temperatures cool and fish numbers increase.

* A few steelhead are beginning to show up in the lower Grande Ronde River and are being caught by anglers patient enough to put time in on the river.

ALDRICH PONDS: trout

Limit is two fish per day. Access is 4 wheel drive only plus a two mile hike. Fishing is inhibited by weed growth but some nice trout are available.

GRANDE RONDE, WALLOWA, IMNAHA RIVERS AND TRIBUTARIES: trout, steelhead

Trout angling in the lower Grande Ronde, Wallowa, and Imnaha Rivers is fair to good. A few steelhead are beginning to show up in the lower Grande Ronde River. Catch rates in last week's creel surveys averaged 16 hours per steelhead landed on the lower Grande Ronde.

HONEYMOON, TEPEE, SALT CREEK AND McGRAW PONDS: trout

Honeymoon, Salt Creek, McGraw and Tepee ponds have been stocked with rainbow trout.

JOHN DAY RIVER: bass, catfish and trout

Smallmouth bass and channel catfish angling is fair to good. A few steelhead are beginning to enter the lower river but flows are still very low. Remember the bass limit changes below Service Creek to 5 fish per day with no more than one over 16 inches. All bass between 12 and 16 inches must be released unharmed.

Trout angling has improved with the cooler weather.

JUBILEE LAKE: trout

Jubilee Lake was stocked in late August, and angling has been good.

KINNEY LAKE: trout

Kinney Lake has been stocked with legal-sized trout. Trout angling should be good.

LADD POND\PEACH POND: trout

Fishing is slow-fair. Fish morning or evening for best results.

LOST and JUMP-OFF-JOE LAKES: trout

Good fishing for rainbow trout but weed growth is inhibiting bank anglers. Best success has been from anglers using float tubes.

MAGONE LAKE: trout

Fishing for rainbow and brook trout is fair.

McKAY RESERVIOR: yellow perch, crappie, largemouth bass

Anglers are reminded McKay Reservior is closed to all angling from Oct. 1 - April 30.

MORGAN LAKE: trout, bullheads, crappie

The Lake has been stocked with legal rainbow trout. Fishing is fair.

OLIVE LAKE: trout

Since the change to stocking triploid trout two years ago, fishing has improved substantially. The high altitude and lack of aquatic weeds makes for pleasant fishing at this lake.

PENDLAND LAKE: trout

The lake experienced a heavy winter kill and angling will be greatly impacted this spring and summer. The lake has been stocked with legal-sized trout and angling should be fair. The lake also will be re-stocked with fingerlings.

ROULET POND: trout

The Pond has been stocked several times with legal-sized trout.

ROWE CREEK RESERVOIR, LONG CREEK POND, CAVENDER POND AND ANSON WRIGHT POND: trout

Fishing for rainbow trout is good. Fish are feeding again with the return of cool weather.

TROUT FARM POND: trout

Angling success is good for brook trout and rainbow trout. Aquatic weed growth is inhibiting bank anglers.

UMATILLA FOREST PONDS: trout

The Umatilla forest ponds have been stocked and angling should improve as water temperatures cool.

UMATILLA RIVER: steelhead, coho, fall chinook jacks and trout

The Umatilla River opened for adipose fin-clipped steelhead, coho and fall chinook jacks on Sept. 1. Angling should continue to improve as water temperatures cool and fish numbers increase. Anglers should consult the synopsis for a complete list of Umatilla and Columbia River angling regulations. Catch and release trout angling in the upper river should be fair.

WALLOWA LAKE: rainbow trout

Wallowa Lake has been stocked with legal-sized rainbow. Trout fishing is good for boat and bank anglers using bait or lures.

WILLOW CREEK RESERVOIR: trout, crappie, bullhead catfish, large and smallmouth bass

A health advisory has been issued for high levels of blue-green algae in Willow Creek Reservoir. The Oregon Department of Human Services recommends that if people choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present, they should remove all fat, skin and organs from the fish before cooking. For local information contact the US Army Corps of Engineers Natural Resource Management Office at (541) 676-9009. For health information, contact Ken Kauffman, DHS Environmental Health Specialist at (971)673-0435. Angling for warmwater species should be good.

NORTHEAST ZONE HUNTING

OPEN: Controlled deer hunting, forest grouse, crow (opens Oct. 1) bear and cougar

Visit the NE Fall Hunting Forecast

Wolves may be present in northeast Oregon

On July 18, 2008 a wolf pack with pups was confirmed in northern Union County. Wolves are listed under Oregon's Endangered Species Act and also protected by federal law. It is unlawful to shoot them. Coyote hunters in northeastern Oregon need to take extra care to identify their target as wolves can look like coyotes, especially wolf pups in the mid-summer and fall.

ODFW needs hunters' assistance to establish wolves' presence in Oregon; please report any wolf sightings or wolf sign to La Grande office (541) 963-2138 or online.

BAKER COUNTY

DEER hunting is open for those with a controlled tag. Due to tough winter there was lower over-winter survival for deer.

FOREST GROUSE season is open. Ruffed grouse can be found in dense riparian shrub cover while blue grouse can be found at higher elevations in more open coniferous forests. ODFW is collecting wings and tails from both species. Please place one entire wing and the entire tail in a paper sack. Mark the bag with the species, date taken, and general location and drop it off at a collection barrel or an ODFW office.

BEAR and COUGAR seasons are open. Remember both cougar and bear check-in are now mandatory. Bear hunters have been doing well using spot and stalk tactics. For best success try portions of the Lookout Mountain and Pine Creek units with abundant berries.

COYOTE numbers are good throughout the district. Remember to ask for permission before hunting on private properties.

GRANT COUNTY

DEER - Expect animals to be widely dispersed. Get off your ATV and walk-in for the best hunting.

FOREST GROUSE and DOVE hunting is open. Hunt for grouse in higher elevations in the draws.

BEAR and COUGAR seasons are now open. Populations of both appear to be increasing, and the Desolation unit should be a good area to find both this fall. Remember check-in is mandatory for successful hunters for both bear and cougar; see the regulations for details.

COYOTES may be responding well to calls. Good areas to try are the South Fork of the John Day and on private lands between Dayville and John Day. Make sure to ask permission before hunting private lands.

MORROW, GILLIAM and WHEELER COUNTIES

DEER are well dispersed throughout the forest. The north slopes and higher elevations are still green for this time of year. Food quality is good. Last year's Monument fire has greened up with shrubs coming on. In the lower elevation areas, hunters will need to focus on areas that have available water. The rain that is forecast for the district should improve hunting conditions; make it a little less crunchy in the woods. Buck numbers are consistent with last year, with all units at or above Buck Ratio MO. Hunter success should be about the same as last year.

To COYOTE hunt, find a good location with fresh coyote sign, preferably in an area of little human activity. Watch wind direction to help prevent giving away your location. Using fawn distress type calls, in addition to rabbit, can be very effective.

BEAR and COUGAR seasons are now open. Cougar numbers are increasing in most areas. Bear numbers are increasing in the Heppner and Fossil units but populations are still relatively low compared to other areas of northeast Oregon. Remember check-in is mandatory for successful hunters for both bear and cougar; see the regulations for details.

To COYOTE hunt, find a good location with fresh coyote sign, preferably in an area of little human activity. Watch wind direction to help prevent giving away your location. Using fawn distress type calls, in addition to rabbit, can be very effective.

UMATILLA COUNTY

DEER hunting should be similar to last year.

BEAR and COUGAR seasons are now open. Bear density is highest north of Interstate 84. Cougar populations are high. Remember check-in is mandatory for successful hunters for both bear and cougar; see the regulations for details.

High numbers of COYOTES can be found in the lower elevation forested areas of Umatilla County on public land. Calling will produce a number of opportunities in coyote concentration areas. Looking for tracks along roads or ridgelines will provide a good indication of the presence of coyotes in any specific area.

UNION COUNTY

Catherine Creek Unit hunters, the bridge at the mouth of Buck Creek is closed and will remain so until the US Forest Service is able to repair it.

DEER buck ratios are at or near management objectives in the Starkey, Catherine Creek and East MT. Emily Units. Fawn survival through last winter is at or slightly below average. Deer hunter success is expected to be average this year.

ELK-Elk populations are over management objective (m.o.) objective in Catherine Creek, at m.o. in Starkey and under m.o. in Mt. Emily. It is encouraging that calf survival this year in all these units is higher than last year. Those male calves will be spike bulls available to hunters this season. Elk hunter success is expected to be better than average.

BEAR and COUGAR hunting is open. Numbers are good in all units. Ripening fruit will become important for bears during late summer and hunters should check these areas for activity. Hunters may encounter a deer or elk killed by a bear or cougar. Setting up about 150 yards downwind of the kill site during the twilight hours may be productive. Always prop the mouth wide open in cougars and bears immediately after harvest; it is easier for biologists to pull a tooth. Hunters bringing in frozen heads with the jaw shut will be asked to return at a later date with the jaw open. Remember the new rule; all harvested bears must be checked in within 10 days of harvest.

GAME BIRDS - Quail/ Chukar/Hun seasons open Oct. 11 and pheasant opens Oct. 18. Grouse hunting is currently open. The warm weather will probably concentrate grouse and quail along stream corridors. As the fall berries ripen, grouse may be located near those berry patches.

COYOTE - Numbers are strong throughout the county. Using predator calls as a lure and moving call sights after 20 minutes is an effective method for harvesting coyotes. Be sure to ask permission before hunting on private land.

LADD MARSH WILDLIFE AREA

The Glass Hill unit (west of Foothill Rd) is open to public access year-round including authorized area hunting seasons. The rest of the wildlife area is closed except during authorized waterfowl (including early goose season), quail and pheasant seasons. Tag and permit holders may also access the wildlife area during special youth hunts. During all authorized hunting seasons, hunting is prohibited in posted refuges and safety zones on the wildlife area.

WALLOWA DISTRICT

DEER: Controlled rifle buck season opens October 4 and hunters can expect a relatively slow season this year. Loss of deer this past winter has resulted in fewer yearling and adult bucks available for harvest. Hunters will likely need to put in more time and miles of hiking to find a buck Areas that are cooler with green forage available will be good locations to find bucks.

COYOTE: Good numbers of coyotes can be found throughout Wallowa County. Calling coyotes with rabbit distress type calls has been effective for hunters. It is important to choose areas with abundant coyote sign and little human activity.

COUGAR: Cougar numbers are still strong through out the district. Hunters will improve chances of success by locating a recent kill site and calling in the area or waiting for a lion to return to a cached carcass.

BLACK BEAR: Opportunities for black bear are good and hunters should focus efforts in riparian areas where berries are ripening, or old homestead areas where fruit trees are still producing fruit.

FOREST GROUSE: Hunter success has been poor. Blue grouse numbers are still low and hunters can expect to put in more time hiking to find birds. Ridges and areas near springs are good places to find birds. Ruffed grouse populations are more stable and birds can be found in or near most riparian areas.

TRAVEL MANAGEMENT: Noregaard, whiskey Creek, and Shamrock vehicle road closures will be in effect. Wildhorse Ridge - Tepee Butte roads in the Chesnimnus unit, and the Lord Flat Road and PO Saddle Road in the Snake River unit are closed to vehicles.

NORTHEAST ZONE VIEWING

Baker County

Bighorn sheep can be seen along the Burnt River Canyon west of Durkee or along the Snake River Road south of Richland. Mountain Goats can bee seen along the crest of the Elkhorn Mountains. For the best viewing opportunities take the short hike to the Twin Lakes basin. Nannies can be distinguished from Billies by their horn curvature and body size.

Gilliam, Morrow and Wheeler Counties

With fall's colder weather, most of the summer migrants are on their way to wintering areas. Rough-legged hawks and Short-eared owls should start showing up in October. Sharp Shinned Hawks are being seen along the waterways. As winter approaches, duck and goose species will start appearing in greater numbers.

Elk can be seen from Heppner/Spray junction on Highway 19. Best time is dusk, watch the hill sides south of the river. Elk can be seen from the junction to Kimberly.

Union County

Young gallinaceous birds such as pheasants quail and Hungarian partridge are growing rapidly and can be seen in early morning in mowed fields and along road on the perimeter of Grande Ronde Valley. For a fairly long driving tour, try going up the Grande Ronde River through Vey meadows, North Fork John Day Campground, Anthony Lakes ski area then down to North powder. This would be great in the early morning or late evening. You could see elk deer possibly a bear, grouse, and a great variety of smaller birds.

Sandhill Cranes should be moving through the Grande Ronde Valley through this month. Currently groups of 30 or more can sometimes be found in grain fields north of the Ladd Marsh Wildlife area. Yellowlegs, sandpipers and other shorebirds should be moving through the area in the next several weeks.

ODFW's Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, La Grande

Fall migration is in progress for some species of birds. Migrating shorebirds may be seen in any of the shallow water flats on the Tule Lake Public Access Area. Check the tree and shrub rows for migrant passerines.

White birds continue to be in evidence on Ladd Marsh. Groups of American white pelicans can be seen from Foothill road as they feed in the wetlands below. Great egrets are scattered throughout the wildlife area and two tundra swans have stayed on Ladd Marsh all summer. The great blue heron chicks from the Catherine Creek rookery appear to have fledged as high numbers of juveniles have been seen throughout the area.

An estimated thirteen pairs of greater sandhill cranes nested at Ladd Marsh this year. These birds, along with their young and additional non-breeding and migrating cranes may be seen in fields in and around the wildlife area. Please report any banded sandhill cranes observed to wildlife area staff (541-963-4954). Banded cranes may have colored bands on both legs; it is important to note the combination and position of the color bands and which leg they were on.

Birds are not the only wildlife to be seen on Ladd Marsh. Elk and deer may also be observed from Foothill Road and other county roads in the area.

There are numerous quality viewing opportunities from the roads that pass through the area. Binoculars or a spotting scope will help as many animals are best viewed from a distance.

Dogs are not permitted within the Wildlife Area, on or off leash except on hunt days during authorized hunting seasons. Dog training is allowed in the Glass Hill Unit (west of Foothill Road) from August 1 until the opening of the upland game bird season. For more information on access rules for the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, please consult the 2008-2009 Oregon Game Bird Regulations.

Directions to Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area

Umatilla County

Riparian areas, from low to high, will have a good number of species of passerines including Bullock's orioles, yellow warblers, western tanagers, and numerous finches and wrens for people to observe or photograph. Lusher areas of the Umatilla National Forest offer opportunities to view species such as olive-sided flycatchers and red-naped sapsuckers.

Early summer is an opportune time to get out and observe and photograph a variety of wildlife species. Deer and elk are active through out the day. Newborn deer fawns and elk calves can often be seen during the month of June and early July.

Flocks of ducks and geese can be seen along the Columbia River and large reservoirs in the County as they feed up for the northern migration.

Elk will still be common along the upper open areas of the west slope of the Blue Mountains. Deer will be seen in herds from the valley floor to the upper Blue Mountains. The riverine and agricultural areas near the base of the mountains will be dominated by white-tailed deer. The desert and mountain areas will be inhabited primarily by mule deer. Elk can be viewed throughout the day while deer will be most visible in the first and last two hours of the day.

As spring comes into full bloom, neotropical migrants will begin to appear. Gulls and raptors including bald eagles can be seen along the Columbia River. Visit local wildlife areas to see shore and marsh birds in addition to perching birds and raptors.

Wood ducks can be seen traveling in flocks up and down the river systems with cottonwood trees along the banks.

Wallowa County

There are kokanee spawning in the Wallowa River above Wallowa Lake. The river from the lake to Wallowa Falls closed to angling on August 31 to protect spawning kokanee.

While driving along the county roads in the valley, watch for raptors hunting in hay fields.

If you are interested in viewing elk during the rut, take a drive to the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve. You'll have to watch from the county roads, so bring your binoculars and spotting scopes. It's worth the drive! Visit The Nature Conservancy's Web site for more information.

Teaching the salmon life cycle to kids

Visit the Eagle Canyon exhibit at the Oregon Zoo, http://www.oregonzoo.org/Exhibits/GreatNW/EagleCanyon/salmon.htm

Download a color book created for kids by the USFWS, http://www.piercecountywa.org/xml/services/home/environ/ed/life%20cycle%20of%20a%20salmon.pdf

SNAKE RIVER ZONE

FISHING

BROWNLEE RESERVOIR: crappie, bass, catfish, bluegill, trout, perch

Crappie fishing has been very good all summer. Fish are 6-9 inches. Jigs with crappie nibbles have been working well. Bluegill and bass are biting well also. Large catfish are being caught in the Powder River Arm with worms and cut-bait. Perch are in schools but angling is good once you find them. Water level is 34 feet below full. Call Idaho Power Company's recording at 1-800-422-3143 to get information on access at recreational sites or visit their Web site under the "Rivers and Recreation" heading.

Reservoir level information

OXBOW RESERVOIR: trout, crappie, bass, catfish

Large crappie are in 30-35 feet of water. Smaller crappie can be caught from shore. Perch are in schools, so fishing is spotty. Catfish angling is fair using cutbait. Bass fishing has been very good also. Cooler temperatures should be better for trout angling.

HELLS CANYON RESERVOIR: trout, crappie, bass, catfish

Good angling for crappie, bass, and catfish. Crappie are running 10-12 inches and can be found in deep water with greens or red sparkle jigs. Crappie are generally in back eddies and along steep banks. Trout angling should increase with the cooler temperatures.

SNAKE RIVER below HELLS CANYON RESERVOIR: trout, smallmouth bass

Trout and smallmouth bass fishing have been very good below the dam. Some 16 inch bass are being caught. Steelhead fishing opened Sept. 1 for adipose clipped fish, and a few are being caught. Get updated information on flow levels.

SNAKE RIVER (Above Brownlee Reservoir): channel catfish, flathead catfish, smallmouth bass

Flows near Nyssa have ranged from 8,650 to 10,2000 cfs from Sept. 24 through Sept. 29. Flows near Weiser have ranged from 11,000 cfs to 12,500 cfs from Sept. 24 through Sept. 29. Angling is fair for 18 to 28 inch catfish. Smallmouth bass angling is fair.

FISHING

Weekend Fishing Opportunities

" Catch rates have improved for sturgeon anglers in the lower Columbia River this past weekend, with boat anglers in the Gorge averaging almost one legal-size sturgeon per boat.

Effective Saturday Sept. 20, 2008 through Dec. 31, 2008 or until further notice chinook retention is allowed from the boundary marker on the lower end of Bachelor Island to the Warrior Rock Lighthouse upstream to Bonneville Dam.

The daily bag limit on fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River below Bonneville dam increases to two fish, effective Thursday, Sept. 25 through the remainder of the year. The bag limit was increased following reports that showed continued improvement in projected fall chinook population estimates. This action follows the recent decision to reopen the fall chinook season below Bonneville dam and let it run until the end of the year, subject to ongoing review of run sizes.

The extended season and increased bag limit apply to the Columbia River from the Warrior Rock-Bachelor Island line above the mouth of the Lewis River upstream to Bonneville dam. As a result of these actions, anglers may keep up to two chinook, coho and steelhead per day in combination. Retained chinook do not have to be fin-clipped. However, any coho or steelhead must be adipose fin-clipped in order to be retained, as prescribed under permanent fishing regulations.

Adipose-clipped coho and steelhead may also be kept in the Columbia River below its confluence with the Lewis River.

Buoy 10 to Tongue Point remains closed to all salmon and steelhead angling.

Columbia River Fish Counts:

https://www.nwp.usace.army.mil/op/fishdata/home.asp

Regulations:

http://www.dfw.state.or.us/resources/fishing/reg_changes/columbia.asp

SALMON, STEELHEAD AND SHAD:

Salmonid angling is beginning to wind down; however, there are still a few fish being caught in the Gorge and at tributary mouths. Anglers in the Gorge produced the highest catch rates this past weekend where boat anglers averaged 0.50 fall chinook caught per boat and bank anglers averaged 0.15 fall chinook caught per bank angler. Boat anglers in the Portland to Longview area averaged 0.06 fall chinook and 0.06 coho caught per boat, while anglers in Troutdale averaged 0.03 fall chinook and 0.06 coho caught per boat.

Gorge Bank:

Weekend checking showed five fall chinook kept and one unclipped coho released for 33 bank anglers.

Gorge Boats:

Weekend checking showed seven fall chinook kept and one unclipped coho released for 14 boats (complete trips).

Troutdale Bank:

No report.

Troutdale Boats:

Weekend checking showed one adipose fin-clipped coho kept, plus one fall chinook and one unclipped coho released for 34 boats (complete trips).

Portland to Longview Boats:

Weekend checking showed one fall chinook and one adipose fin-clipped coho kept for 16 boats (complete & incomplete trips).

Portland to Rainier Bank:

No report.

Estuary Boat (Above Tongue Point):

No report.

STURGEON:

Catch rates improved for sturgeon anglers in the lower Columbia River this past weekend. Boat anglers in the Gorge averaged 0.90 legal white sturgeon caught per boat, while anglers in the Portland to Longview area averaged 0.57 legal white sturgeon caught per boat. Sturgeon anglers in Troutdale averaged 0.20 legal white sturgeon caught per boat. Bank anglers in the Gorge averaged 0.19 legal white sturgeon caught per bank rod.

Gorge Bank:

Weekend checking showed 32 legal white sturgeon kept, plus two legal, eight oversize, and 27 sublegal sturgeon released for 187 bank anglers.

Gorge Boats:

Weekend checking showed 19 legal white sturgeon kept, plus seven oversize and 199 sublegal sturgeon released for 21 boats (complete trips).

Troutdale Bank:

Weekend checking showed no catch for nine bank anglers.

Troutdale Boats:

Weekend checking showed one legal white sturgeon kept, plus one oversize and nine sublegal sturgeon released for five boats (complete trips).

Portland to Rainier Bank:

Weekly checking showed three sublegal sturgeon released for 12 bank anglers.

Portland to Longview Boats:

Weekend checking showed 17 legal white sturgeon kept, plus three legal and 64 sublegal sturgeon released for 35 boats (complete & incomplete trips).

WALLEYE:

Gorge boats:

Weekend checking showed one walleye kept for one boat (complete trip).

Troutdale boats:

Weekend checking showed two walleye kept for three boats (complete trips).

Portland to Longview Boats:

No report.

MARINE ZONE

MARINE FISHING

October brings additional fishing and clamming opportunities. Bottom fishers may now fish for rockfish, lingcod and other species at all depths and are not restricted by the summer conservation closure outside of the 40-fathom line. Razor clam diggers may return to the Clatsop beaches after the annual conservation closure, which lasts from July 15 to Sept. 30 each year to protect newly-set clams.

Shellfish biologists worry that diggers may be disappointed in the size of what they find when they return to the most productive razor clam beaches in the state. The clams are small because of a late set, probably as a result of the massive storm systems this winter. During ODFW's summer clam surveys the average size was less than 3 inches. While clams are small there are a lot of them and they are just as good to eat as larger clams. Some diggers consider the smaller clams less desirable because there is not as much meat and the shells are more fragile than a larger razor clam making the smaller clams more difficult to clean.

Shellfish regulations require diggers to keep the first 15 clams dug, regardless of size or condition. Reburying a razor clam, even if its shell is unbroken, usually results in the clam's death.

Oct. 1 through 4 the Chetco River Ocean Terminal Area (Twin Rocks 42°05"36"N. Lat. to the Oregon/California Border and seaward 3 nautical miles) is open for one adult chinook per day and no more than four from within the Chetco River Ocean Terminal Area per season. Additional dates of Oct. 10-11 and Oct. 17-18 will be considered if weather significantly limits participation in the Oct 1-4 open period. Minimum length limit is 24 inches and single point, single shank barbless hooks are required.

The Tillamook ocean terminal area is open through Nov. 15 for chinook salmon. All other salmon in the ocean is closed. For more information please visit: http://www.dfw.state.or.us/mrp/salmon/index.asp.

Tuna may still be found 30-40 miles off the coast, but anglers report difficulties getting the fish to bite. The average catch was less than two fish per angler. It's official; Oregon tuna fishers made this the second highest catch eclipsing 2004, with 2007 being the highest catch year.

Although the final numbers are not all in, fishing for halibut outside of the 40 fathom line is most likely closed for the rest of the year. There should be plenty of quota remaining for the nearshore halibut season (inside the 40-fathom line) for the central coast to last until Oct. 31. The daily bag limit for the nearshore fishery remains at one halibut. It is open seven days a week.

Catches of rockfish are improving with some anglers getting limits. The average catch per angler is about 3 fish. Lingcod catch improved this week with about half the anglers finding success. The marine fish bag limit is back at six fish. Beginning Oct. 1, fishing for bottomfish is allowed at all depths. Boat anglers may not retain cabezon until Jan. 1.

A list of fish included in the six-fish marine bag limit and waypoints for the 40-fathom line can be found in the 2008 Oregon Sport Ocean Regulations for Salmon, Halibut and other Marine Fish Species and online at http://www.dfw.state.or.us/mrp

Remember: yelloweye rockfish and canary rockfish may not be retained. The Stonewall Bank Yelloweye Rockfish Conservation Area approximately 15 miles west of Newport is closed to the harvest of rockfish, lingcod, flatfish and others.

SHELLFISH

The Oregon Department of Agriculture is extending the area closed to recreational mussel harvesting from Roads End in Lincoln County, south of Cascade Head, to the mouth of the Columbia River due to elevated levels of paralytic shellfish poisoning or PSP toxins. The closure includes mussels on the beaches, rocks, jetties, and at the entrance to bays in this section of the Oregon Coast. The announced expansion follows the Sept. 18 closure on the south coast from Bastendorf Beach, near the south jetty at Coos Bay, to the California border, which remains closed. Recreational mussel harvesting from Bastendorf Beach north to Roads End remains open.

The recreational harvest of all other clams, mussels and scallops is open coastwide. Harvesters should check for current closures on the ODA shellfish safety page or call the shellfish hotline, 503-986-4728 or 1-800-448-2474. Waters can be closed on short notice because of contaminated waters due to coastal flooding and because of elevated levels of naturally occurring toxins.

Check out the recreational clam pages on the ODFW Web site: http://www.dfw.state.or.us/mrp/ then click on the shellfish icon. The pages contain everything you need to know for identifying and harvesting Oregon's clams.

CRABS

Catching Dungeness crab in the ocean is closed until Dec. 1.

Recreational crabbing is still open in the bays and estuaries. Sport catches are between three and five crabs per angler, depending on the bay.

Some sport crabbers have difficulty correctly measuring the minimum size for Dungeness crab, which is 5 3?4 inches measured in a straight line across the back immediately in front of, but not including, the points. For a photograph and diagram see page 101 of the Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations booklet.

MARINE ZONE VIEWING

EVENT

Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge Grand Opening, Oct. 11, 2008

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will host a celebration of Wildlife and the Arts on Saturday, Oct. 11. The free event honors the grand opening of the Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge near Cloverdale on the north Oregon coast.

The Refuge will open at 9 a.m. with a ribbon cutting ceremony at 10:45 a.m. followed by free guided walks from 11 a.m. - 12:30 pm. Refuge staff will be onsite to answer questions from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

There is a paved, wheelchair-accessible trail that leads to an elevated viewing deck. The paved Pacific View Trail and Deck affords visitors a sweeping view of the Pacific Ocean.

For a calendar of events, visit the USFWS Web site.

Free Color Brochure: Seabirds of the Pacific Northwest

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service offers a free, beautifully illustrated brochure, Seabirds of the Pacific Northwest, to help you learn more about these fascinating migratory birds. The brochure is available online as a pdf, at Chamber of Commerce Visitor Centers along the coast or by calling the USFWS at (541) 867-4550.

E-mail Dawn Grafe, USFWS, for more information or to get multiple copies of the brochure, dawn_grafe@fws.gov

Copyright 2015 Lebanon Express. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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